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Thread started 10/23/19 3:00pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Bed, Bath and Beyond Pulls 'Blackface Pumpkins From the Shelves...

WoW. I mean it is halloween. dark and shadows, black cats, witches, vampires etc

I have a ceramic white pumpkin with black colored eyes/nose/mouth. I saw a similar that was black with white eyes/nose/mouth. Sensitivities about too much stuff, is going to and is causing a backlash. Cannot keep crying wolf to everything. It makes really important stuff meaningless.

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https://www.msn.com/en-us...spartanntp

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Bed, Bath & Beyond has pulled black jack-o-lantern pumpkins from their shelves after a Nyack, N.Y., community complained publicly about the pumpkins. The jack-o-lanterns, which are black and feature white paint for the grin, nose, and eyes, were placed out in front of a Nyack law firm Feerick, Nugent, and MacCartney. Within 48 hours, the law firm had gotten enough complaints about the pumpkins that they took the display down — but the firm also raised the question as to how the pumpkins got to Bed Bath & Beyond shelves in the first place.

When a local news crew investigated the incident, the law firm said that their intention was to never offend or exclude anyone — so as soon as they got complaints, they took down the display. Local NAACP Director Wilbur Aldridge said the pumpkins being displayed depicted an “extreme lack of sensitivity.”

RkD0IclQ?format=png&name=600x314

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

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Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #1 posted 10/24/19 6:18pm

onlyforaminute

They should have made haunted houses out of those, that's what I did in my attempts to make a jack o latern village. Nothing in the rule book says they have to be faces. Those kits you buy come with all kinds of designs to carve pumpkins that aren't faces. I mean it's not like this kind of stuff hasn't been in the news all year. Their think tank sure is limited.
[Edited 10/24/19 18:19pm]
Year of Return 2019
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Reply #2 posted 10/25/19 5:43am

13cjk13

SNIP - of4$

Be civilized
Do not instigate, engage in, or encourage 'flame wars'. If you insult someone "jokingly", be prepared to have it not interpreted that way by the Moderators. A good general rule: "criticize ideas, not people."

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Reply #3 posted 10/25/19 2:27pm

langebleu

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OldFriends4Sale said:

WoW. I mean it is halloween. dark and shadows, black cats, witches, vampires etc

I have a ceramic white pumpkin with black colored eyes/nose/mouth. I saw a similar that was black with white eyes/nose/mouth. Sensitivities about too much stuff, is going to and is causing a backlash. Cannot keep crying wolf to everything. It makes really important stuff meaningless.

.

.

https://www.msn.com/en-us...spartanntp

.

.

Bed, Bath & Beyond has pulled black jack-o-lantern pumpkins from their shelves after a Nyack, N.Y., community complained publicly about the pumpkins. The jack-o-lanterns, which are black and feature white paint for the grin, nose, and eyes, were placed out in front of a Nyack law firm Feerick, Nugent, and MacCartney. Within 48 hours, the law firm had gotten enough complaints about the pumpkins that they took the display down — but the firm also raised the question as to how the pumpkins got to Bed Bath & Beyond shelves in the first place.

When a local news crew investigated the incident, the law firm said that their intention was to never offend or exclude anyone — so as soon as they got complaints, they took down the display. Local NAACP Director Wilbur Aldridge said the pumpkins being displayed depicted an “extreme lack of sensitivity.”

RkD0IclQ?format=png&name=600x314


I am pretty certain that if pumpkins painted in that way were displayed outside someone's house in the UK, it would understandably be perceived as offensive.

I would also be very suspicious of the motives of someone displaying such an object. I can think of some racist people who would deliberatly display this type of object in order to provoke, but who would hide behind the pretence of it just being all part of 'halloween, dark and shadows, black cats, witches, vampires etc'..




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Reply #4 posted 10/25/19 4:49pm

OldFriends4Sal
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langebleu said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

WoW. I mean it is halloween. dark and shadows, black cats, witches, vampires etc

I have a ceramic white pumpkin with black colored eyes/nose/mouth. I saw a similar that was black with white eyes/nose/mouth. Sensitivities about too much stuff, is going to and is causing a backlash. Cannot keep crying wolf to everything. It makes really important stuff meaningless.

.

.

https://www.msn.com/en-us...spartanntp

.

.

Bed, Bath & Beyond has pulled black jack-o-lantern pumpkins from their shelves after a Nyack, N.Y., community complained publicly about the pumpkins. The jack-o-lanterns, which are black and feature white paint for the grin, nose, and eyes, were placed out in front of a Nyack law firm Feerick, Nugent, and MacCartney. Within 48 hours, the law firm had gotten enough complaints about the pumpkins that they took the display down — but the firm also raised the question as to how the pumpkins got to Bed Bath & Beyond shelves in the first place.

When a local news crew investigated the incident, the law firm said that their intention was to never offend or exclude anyone — so as soon as they got complaints, they took down the display. Local NAACP Director Wilbur Aldridge said the pumpkins being displayed depicted an “extreme lack of sensitivity.”

RkD0IclQ?format=png&name=600x314


I am pretty certain that if pumpkins painted in that way were displayed outside someone's house in the UK, it would understandably be perceived as offensive.

I would also be very suspicious of the motives of someone displaying such an object. I can think of some racist people who would deliberatly display this type of object in order to provoke, but who would hide behind the pretence of it just being all part of 'halloween, dark and shadows, black cats, witches, vampires etc'..

Why? For 'religious' reasons?

I have a charcole steele jack o lantern, and I have a white jack o lantern. I also have a smaller white one with black painted eyes/mouth.

They attached the label 'blackface' to a black jack o lantern

it is not blackface.
“... being offended doesn’t, by itself, make me right.”
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Halloween as a 'holiday/celebration' has turned up times 6 in the last 10yrs.
Decorations, foods, themes etc are way bigger than when I grew up.

Black and Orange are the main colors of the holiday.

Like Red White & Green are Christmas.

Certain colors are associated with this 'celebration' and dark purples, scarlets, dark greens orange, whites and black are common color themes. I'm not into Halloween like other people I know. But they are really taking the decoration options to the levels of Christmas Easter and the 4th of July.
It is a jack o lantern. Why would this below be offensive?

I just think it is to much on the edge of jumping at shadows and possibilities of someones hearts motive.
Jack o lanterns like this are not new. And I strong suspect if the NAACP didn't find it offensive it would not have been.

I mean it is 'Halloween' where does the line of policing peoples thoughts and motives come in on this?

Is Halloween celebrated in the UK? Is it something new or has it been for a long time?

the NAACP has to do something to remain relevant. So here we go.
I say this to their reaction: "Those who are determined to be offended will discover a provocation somewhere."

In the late 80s and 90s when African Americans offended at the increased use of the N word in film and music, I wish people reacted the same way for them. I wish the NAACP moved to action to shut down something that was more substatially damaging in a deeper and longer term affect spanning generations. The N word vs a black jack o lantern.

gettyimages-1037604592.jpg?quality=70&strip=all&w=720&h=379&crop=1

Jack-o'-lanterns are a yearly Halloween tradition that came to the United States from Irish immigrants.

A jack-o'-lantern (or jack o'lantern) is a carved pumpkin, turnip, or other root vegetable lantern[1] associated with Halloween. Its name comes from the phenomenon of a strange light flickering over peatbogs, called will-o'-the-wisp or jack-o'-lantern. The name is also tied to the Irish legend of Stingy Jack, a drunkard who bargains with Satan and is doomed to roam the Earth with only a hollowed turnip to light his way.

In a jack-o'-lantern, the top of the pumpkin or turnip is cut off to form a lid, the inside flesh is scooped out, and an image — usually a scary or funny face – is carved out of the rind to expose the hollow interior. To create the lantern effect, a light source, traditionally a flame such as a candle or tea light, is placed within before the lid is closed. However, artificial jack-'o-lanterns with electric lights are also marketed. It is common to see jack-o'-lanterns on doorsteps and otherwise used as decorations prior to and on Halloween.

Black-and-Green-Pumpkins-1.jpg

The carving of vegetables has been a common practice in many parts of the world, and gourds were one of the earliest plant species farmed by humans c. 10,000 years ago.[4] For example, gourds were used to carve lanterns by the Māori over 700 years ago;[5] the Māori word for a gourd also describes a lampshade.[6]

It is believed that the custom of making jack-o'-lanterns at Hallowe'en time began in Ireland.[7][8][9] In the 19th century, "turnips or mangel wurzels, hollowed out to act as lanterns and often carved with grotesque faces," were used on Halloween in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.[10] In these Gaelic-speaking regions, Halloween was also the festival of Samhain and was seen as a time when supernatural beings (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, walked the earth. Jack-o'-lanterns were also made at Halloween time in Somerset (see Punkie Night) during the 19th century.[10]

By those who made them, the lanterns were said to represent either spirits or supernatural beings,[10] or were used to ward off evil spirits.[11] For example, sometimes they were used by Halloween participants to frighten people,[11][12][13] and sometimes they were set on windowsills to keep harmful spirits out of one's home.[12] It has also been suggested that the jack-o'-lanterns originally represented Christian souls in purgatory, as Halloween is the eve of All Saints' Day (1 November)/All Souls' Day (2 November).[14]

On Halloween in 1835, the Dublin Penny Journal wrote a long story on the legend of "Jack-o'-the-Lantern".[15] In 1837, the Limerick Chronicle refers to a local pub holding a carved gourd competition and presenting a prize to "the best crown of Jack McLantern". The term "McLantern" also appears in an 1841 publication of the same paper.[16]

There is also evidence that turnips were used to carve what was called a "Hoberdy's Lantern" in Worcestershire, England, at the end of the 18th century. The folklorist Jabez Allies recalls:

In my juvenile days I remember to have seen peasant boys make, what they called a "Hoberdy's Lantern," by hollowing out a turnip, and cutting eyes, nose, and mouth therein, in the true moon-like style; and having lighted it up by inserting the stump of a candle, they used to place it upon a hedge to frighten unwary travellers in the night.[17]

The carving of vegetables has been a common practice in many parts of the world, and gourds were one of the earliest plant species farmed by humans c. 10,000 years ago.[4] For example, gourds were used to carve lanterns by the Māori over 700 years ago;[5] the Māori word for a gourd also describes a lampshade.[6]

It is believed that the custom of making jack-o'-lanterns at Hallowe'en time began in Ireland.[7][8][9] In the 19th century, "turnips or mangel wurzels, hollowed out to act as lanterns and often carved with grotesque faces," were used on Halloween in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.[10] In these Gaelic-speaking regions, Halloween was also the festival of Samhain and was seen as a time when supernatural beings (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, walked the earth. Jack-o'-lanterns were also made at Halloween time in Somerset (see Punkie Night) during the 19th century.[10]

By those who made them, the lanterns were said to represent either spirits or supernatural beings,[10] or were used to ward off evil spirits.[11] For example, sometimes they were used by Halloween participants to frighten people,[11][12][13] and sometimes they were set on windowsills to keep harmful spirits out of one's home.[12] It has also been suggested that the jack-o'-lanterns originally represented Christian souls in purgatory, as Halloween is the eve of All Saints' Day (1 November)/All Souls' Day (2 November).[14]

On Halloween in 1835, the Dublin Penny Journal wrote a long story on the legend of "Jack-o'-the-Lantern".[15] In 1837, the Limerick Chronicle refers to a local pub holding a carved gourd competition and presenting a prize to "the best crown of Jack McLantern". The term "McLantern" also appears in an 1841 publication of the same paper.[16]

There is also evidence that turnips were used to carve what was called a "Hoberdy's Lantern" in Worcestershire, England, at the end of the 18th century. The folklorist Jabez Allies recalls:

In my juvenile days I remember to have seen peasant boys make, what they called a "Hoberdy's Lantern," by hollowing out a turnip, and cutting eyes, nose, and mouth therein, in the true moon-like style; and having lighted it up by inserting the stump of a candle, they used to place it upon a hedge to frighten unwary travellers in the night.[17]


330px-Friendly_pumpkin.jpg


In North America

Adaptations of Washington Irving's short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1820) often show the Headless Horseman with a pumpkin or jack-o'-lantern in place of his severed head. (In the original story, a shattered pumpkin is discovered next to Ichabod Crane's abandoned hat on the morning after Crane's supposed encounter with the Horseman.)

The application of the term to carved pumpkins in American English is first seen in 1834.[18] The carved pumpkin lantern's association with Halloween is recorded in the 1 November 1866 edition of the Daily News (Kingston, Ontario):

The old time custom of keeping up Hallowe'en was not forgotten last night by the youngsters of the city. They had their maskings and their merry-makings, and perambulated the streets after dark in a way which was no doubt amusing to themselves. There was a great sacrifice of pumpkins from which to make transparent heads and face, lighted up by the unfailing two inches of tallow candle.[19]

James Fenimore Cooper wrote a nautical novel titled The Jack O'lantern (le Feu-Follet), Or the Privateer (1842). The Jack O'lantern was the name of the ship.[20]

The poet John Greenleaf Whittier, who was born in Massachusetts in 1807, wrote the poem "The Pumpkin" (1850):[21]

Oh!—fruit loved of boyhood!—the old days recalling,
When wood-grapes were purpling and brown nuts were falling!
When wild, ugly faces we carved in its skin,
Glaring out through the dark with a candle within!

Agnes Carr Sage, in the article, "Halloween Sports and Customs" (Harper's Young People (1885):[22]

It is an ancient British custom to light great bonfires (Bone-fire to clear before Winter froze the ground) on Hallowe'en, and carry blazing fagots about on long poles; but in place of this, American boys delight in the funny grinning jack-o'-lanterns made of huge yellow pumpkins with a candle inside.

In the United States, the carved pumpkin was first associated with the harvest season in general, long before it became a symbol of Halloween.[23] In 1895, an article on Thanksgiving entertaining recommended a lit jack-o'-lantern as part of the festivities.

Sections of the pumpkin or turnip are cut out to make holes, often depicting a face, which may be either cheerful, scary, or comical.[34] Complex carving
s (or paintings on the gourds) are becoming more common such as: figures, logos, and symbols. A variety of tools can be used to carve and hollow out the gourd, ranging from simple knives and spoons to specialized instruments, typically sold in holiday sections of North American grocery stores. Printed stencils can be used as a guide for increasingly complex designs. After carving, a light source (such as a flame candle, electric candle, or tea light) is placed inside the gourd, and the top is put back into place. The source is normally inserted to light the design from the inside and add an extra measure of spookiness. Sometimes a chimney is carved, too. It is possible to create surprisingly artistic designs, either simple or intricate in nature.

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3e71a7dbffb696e0a671ccd55f55c41f

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #5 posted 10/26/19 1:45am

langebleu

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If I decided to wear blackface, my black neighbours might be offended.

If I dressed up as a witch this halloween, wearing a black hat and black cape, and then decided to paint my face black, my black neighbours might be offended.

If I purchased and carved a pumpkin this halloween, and decided to paint its face black, and then lit it and placed it outside my house, my black neighbours might be offended.

My black neighbours might be offended in my taking those actions - not because the NAACP had made a prononcement on such matters - they might have no idea that the NAACP had spoken out against it.

They might be offended, - but not because they are 'determined to be offended' - they are not.

They might be offended because a painted black face has a loaded cultural association and, whilst, for example, the colour black is associated at Halloween times with witch's clothes and a witch's cat, it's not associated with painting your face black, or buying an orange pumpkin and painting its face black.

I recognise the historic cultural association with the painted black face and that, by my painting either my face black, or a carved pumpkin's face black, it could give rise to offence because of that connection.

I also know that, if I were to rationalise the painting of the face black on the grounds that black is a colour associated with halloween, it would be disingenuous of me. The witch's face is not traditionally painted black, nor is the carved pumpkin's face traditionally painted black.

I'm also aware that trying to extend the use of a painted black face in these ways, could be used by people with racist views to deliberately provoke and offend others. A person deliberately seeking to offend in this way could also attempt to hide behind an excuse such as the colour black is associated with Halloween, or that people who are offended by this are 'determined tio be offended'.






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Reply #6 posted 10/26/19 5:29am

2elijah

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langebleu said:

If I decided to wear blackface, my black neighbours might be offended.

If I dressed up as a witch this halloween, wearing a black hat and black cape, and then decided to paint my face black, my black neighbours might be offended.

If I purchased and carved a pumpkin this halloween, and decided to paint its face black, and then lit it and placed it outside my house, my black neighbours might be offended.

My black neighbours might be offended in my taking those actions - not because the NAACP had made a prononcement on such matters - they might have no idea that the NAACP had spoken out against it.

They might be offended, - but not because they are 'determined to be offended' - they are not.

They might be offended because a painted black face has a loaded cultural association and, whilst, for example, the colour black is associated at Halloween times with witch's clothes and a witch's cat, it's not associated with painting your face black, or buying an orange pumpkin and painting its face black.

I recognise the historic cultural association with the painted black face and that, by my painting either my face black, or a carved pumpkin's face black, it could give rise to offence because of that connection.

I also know that, if I were to rationalise the painting of the face black on the grounds that black is a colour associated with halloween, it would be disingenuous of me. The witch's face is not traditionally painted black, nor is the carved pumpkin's face traditionally painted black.

I'm also aware that trying to extend the use of a painted black face in these ways, could be used by people with racist views to deliberately provoke and offend others. A person deliberately seeking to offend in this way could also attempt to hide behind an excuse such as the colour black is associated with Halloween, or that people who are offended by this are 'determined tio be offended'.








Great post. clapping
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Reply #7 posted 10/26/19 7:35am

OldFriends4Sal
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Blackface is something TOTALLY different than a Black Jack o Lantern

People might be offended, but it doesn't mean their intentions were what someone is offended at.
And that is the difference. 'Offense' is not the grounds of truth.

.
When I was going to a church back in the 80s, a bunch of us kids were outside laughing a playing. There was a girl whose family was kinda 'puritan' Long story. Well my brother said 'fart', she became offended. Literally. Their family is very, I don't even know the word, but very funny about words. So we were eating dinner that afternoon and got a call from the girl to talk to my brother about the word he used and she was going to take him to the church elder if he did not 'apologize' for saying 'fart'. And she actually did. We were working with her father one day on cleaning out the boiler room and there was a younger kid there, who had to use the bathroom, one of the guys asked 'do you have to pee?' Her father, snapped to attention 'noooo noo you don't say that' another long story. But they were indignantly offended. So word passed around. No one stopped saying fart or pee, they just limited their time and words with that family.
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'traditionally' this is a 'celebration' based on the Night, the blending of the living and the dead, ghosts, vampires, witches, pumpkins with faces... come on

People have to discern the difference between Blackface and a black (or white) Jack o Lantern. There are white painted ones too.

.

But also your black neighbor might not be offended at all, and might have their own. That option has to be accepted as well. We cannot assume that one persons offense speaks for all. We cannot conclude 'this is how ALL black people' will view the Jack O Lantern.

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It is no different from too many peoples assumption, that Black people are ok with the use of the N word(as a term of endearment). Many African-Americans and African descendant people hate that term in every variation. But are now accosted with it because a certain segment thinks they should have the right to use it. The offense of the African American people who believed and protested that word being used publicly, in film and especially in music, was wiped to the side, told to get over it, and stop being so uppity. I cannot stand that slur. But I am told to accept it.
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The people who saw these pumpkins at the law firms office, were they white or black or what? Media trying to get their name out there, trying to land a sweeping story about racial injustice?

We don't even know the ethnicity of the people who were offended. And usually when they don't say the 'race' of the person, they are probably not Black. Because there is a narrative that has to be played out.

.

Mixing up painting your face black with painting a jack o lantern black are two different things.
Context must be in order.

.

I'm part Black, my brother is part black, my cousins Rochelle and Phebe are Black, none of us were offended. We were talking about this the other day. Yes people can be offended at this but it doesn't make it 'BlackFace' which is something different. You keep calling it 'Black Face' It is a Pumpkin. Calling it Black face is equating a Pumpkin with a Black Person. You can rationalize it that way to drive a racial slant, but the truth is it is a Black Jack O Lantern.
.
Yep a person might try to hide behind it. But if the intent is a Black Jack O Lantern, like a White Jack O Lantern or a Green Jack O Lantern, how do you discern the intent, unless the person has an open history of being a bigot? And how do they add that intent to an fantasy object that had nothing to do with Blackface.

Do I think the Law Firm or Bed Bath and Beyond made/set up those as BlackFace? Nope. I don't believe in reading anything they said that they purposed to offend people racially. Law still determines a crime or a wrong by intent/fact.

.

Black Jack O Lanterns have been existing for years. But 'today' someone (white black other) felt the law firm was being racist by placeing Black Jack O Lantern on their display, feeling it was Blackface. Langbleu, it is Halloween, just like Christmas (traditions) can change. It is when people canonize traditions, is when they start being stale. I'm a Christmas traditionalist inthat Santa Klaus is Germanic and Saint Nicolas is Italian or Greek lol but he isn't real. So I enjoy that people can create an African Santa who helps with the Northpole in response to kids inquiring thoughts of 'How does Santa make to everyone in one night' or a Japanese Santa. Traditionally 'witches' are mostly Northern European, does that mean there can be no other witches? The Wicked Witch of the West in the Wizard of Oz was green, her sister the Witch of the North was a natural fair complexion. In the Wiz the WWOTW was dark brown, her sister the WOTS was tan with gold, the WOTN was fair skinned. I mean it's a pumpkin turned into an ole Irish folklore -Jack O Lantern.

.

some of the same people clapping it up because of offense, even on the org accuse the Org of being racist. lol doesn't make it true.

.
And in other news an African-American school security guard get's fired for telling a Black student 'don't call me 'N___'' And there is still no problem with that black kid saying the N word. I wonder if the NAACP intervened in that situation. Thankfully people, even Cher, spoke out against this ruling, and he has his job back. Who is offended at the kid call another person the N word. While 'media outrage' is worrying about a Black Jack O Lantern.

fletcher-1.png?w=90

BALTIMORE — The NAACP calls itself the “oldest and boldest” civil rights organization in the country. The first part of that description is not in dispute. But in an era when activists quickly organize and mobilize mass demonstrations online, the NAACP finds itself struggling to remain on the cutting edge of the social justice movement.

langebleu said:

If I decided to wear blackface, my black neighbours might be offended.

If I dressed up as a witch this halloween, wearing a black hat and black cape, and then decided to paint my face black, my black neighbours might be offended.

If I purchased and carved a pumpkin this halloween, and decided to paint its face black, and then lit it and placed it outside my house, my black neighbours might be offended.

My black neighbours might be offended in my taking those actions - not because the NAACP had made a prononcement on such matters - they might have no idea that the NAACP had spoken out against it.

They might be offended, - but not because they are 'determined to be offended' - they are not.

They might be offended because a painted black face has a loaded cultural association and, whilst, for example, the colour black is associated at Halloween times with witch's clothes and a witch's cat, it's not associated with painting your face black, or buying an orange pumpkin and painting its face black.

I recognise the historic cultural association with the painted black face and that, by my painting either my face black, or a carved pumpkin's face black, it could give rise to offence because of that connection.

I also know that, if I were to rationalise the painting of the face black on the grounds that black is a colour associated with halloween, it would be disingenuous of me. The witch's face is not traditionally painted black, nor is the carved pumpkin's face traditionally painted black.

I'm also aware that trying to extend the use of a painted black face in these ways, could be used by people with racist views to deliberately provoke and offend others. A person deliberately seeking to offend in this way could also attempt to hide behind an excuse such as the colour black is associated with Halloween, or that people who are offended by this are 'determined tio be offended'.






#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #8 posted 10/28/19 10:01pm

purplepolitici
an

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Pic literally made me 😂. Blackface pumpkin nuts
If you can understand my color
Put your hand in your crotch
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Reply #9 posted 10/29/19 5:33am

jaawwnn

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Maybe people are too sensitive, maybe they aren't. Someone clearly complained and this was such a trivial issue that Bed, Bath and Beyond decided it wasn't their hill to die on.

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Reply #10 posted 10/29/19 6:10am

cborgman

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you know who i want to hear from on this? black folk.

until then, i am fairly indifferent on it. i can see how its maybe offensive, i can see how its maybe not.

but this is not my place to weigh in, being white. i dont fully get it, being white. i cant, and wont be able to fully comprehend or have a valid opinion, because i dont know how to react, as i dont have the means to.

i want to hear what our black brothers and sisters of the org think. all other opinions are kind of meh.

.

[Edited 10/29/19 6:20am]

Out-foxing fox-bots for almost 20 years on the org.
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Reply #11 posted 10/29/19 6:44am

OldFriends4Sal
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"They are pumpkins
Black Pumpkins

Idiots

That's all they are"

https://www.youtube.com/w...Bjb-rWCDoY

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
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What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #12 posted 10/29/19 6:48am

jjhunsecker

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cborgman said:

you know who i want to hear from on this? black folk.


until then, i am fairly indifferent on it. i can see how its maybe offensive, i can see how its maybe not.

but this is not my place to weigh in, being white. i dont fully get it, being white. i cant, and wont be able to fully comprehend or have a valid opinion, because i dont know how to react, as i dont have the means to.

i want to hear what our black brothers and sisters of the org think. all other opinions are kind of meh.




.


[Edited 10/29/19 6:20am]



When I see those pumpkins, I almost expect to start hearing them sing "Mammy" like Al Jolson in "The Jazz Singer "
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Reply #13 posted 10/29/19 1:47pm

guitarslinger4
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I don't get it. They dont' even look anything alike, they're pumpkins, not even living things. Are folks really trying to make the case that that those pumpkins and THIS: blackface.jpg?quality=85&strip=all

are the same??

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Reply #14 posted 10/30/19 2:56pm

2elijah

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cborgman said:

you know who i want to hear from on this? black folk.


until then, i am fairly indifferent on it. i can see how its maybe offensive, i can see how its maybe not.

but this is not my place to weigh in, being white. i dont fully get it, being white. i cant, and wont be able to fully comprehend or have a valid opinion, because i dont know how to react, as i dont have the means to.

i want to hear what our black brothers and sisters of the org think. all other opinions are kind of meh.




.


[Edited 10/29/19 6:20am]


To be honest, if someone feels offended by it, regardless if anyone agrees or not with them, then it’s their right to feel that way. However, I’ll stick to the orange pumpkins.

On the other hand, I just took a look at the image again, and maybe if they didn’t use white paint, and did cut-outs instead, as done on most pumpkins, then maybe the pumpkins wouldn’t have looked so close to a ‘blackface’ image. shrug
[Edited 10/30/19 15:13pm]
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Reply #15 posted 10/30/19 7:48pm

onlyforaminute

All I care about in this thread are the cosmos jack o lanterns. I want, I want, I want. The jewelry one is cute too. You can keep the rest of the history lesson.
Year of Return 2019
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Reply #16 posted 10/30/19 8:47pm

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

All I care about in this thread are the cosmos jack o lanterns. I want, I want, I want. The jewelry one is cute too. You can keep the rest of the history lesson.

There is a Halloween decor thread in General Discussion wink

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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