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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > TIME Magazine chronicles the impact of Beyoncé's LEMONADE
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Reply #150 posted 02/25/17 6:31am

MotownSubdivis
ion

avatar

CynicKill said:

She can dance people!



Nah.
[Edited 2/25/17 6:32am]
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Reply #151 posted 02/26/17 1:07pm

214

mjscarousal said:

nextedition said:

mjscarousal said: You dont see the fascination? You must have made like a 1000 messages about her now and you go on and on about her. I would say if one is fascinated by beyonce its you.

Because yall constantly compare her to Prince, MJ, and legends before her and always fawn over her music and performances like she is the only artist in the world that matters wacky Its silly and pathetic. I don't care what yall think about me. I think the fawning over her its creepy so I call it out. Yall make a bunch of threads nearly every week comparing her to a bunch of legends and fawning over her and expect for people to sit back and not have any say about the bullshit? Like Soul said people are TIRED of the constant fawning over every lil thing she does and constantly comparing her to legends when she is overrated and people are entitled to express their opinion on it. Whats fascinating is that yall fawn over Beyonce but then trash legitimate artists like Adele, Bruno, MJ and Janet, that is what is fascinating. Whats fascinating is that yall get bothered about my opinions related to her but never call out the eratic Beyonce stans that troll this site. She is overrated and I will ALWAYS express my opinion on it and NOBODY on this site is going to stop me from expressing my opinion. biggrin

[Edited 2/24/17 22:42pm]

Your obesession with her is a little disturbing.

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Reply #152 posted 03/01/17 5:59pm

badujunkie

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so fuckin badu i can't stand it

theiving b****

I'll leave it alone babe...just be me
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Reply #153 posted 03/13/17 9:38pm

2020

avatar

badujunkie said:



so fuckin badu i can't stand it


theiving b****


Such a classless ho
The greatest live performer of our times was is and always will be Prince.

Remember there is only one destination and that place is U
All of it. Everything. Is U.
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Reply #154 posted 03/13/17 9:40pm

CynicKill

^Why she gotta be a ho tho?

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Reply #155 posted 03/15/17 2:09pm

Curtwill1975

heathilly said:

MotownSubdivision said:
I wouldn't really call what Beyonce does dancing at all. Madonna (a formally trained dancer) in her prime could dance circles around Beyonce. Janet definitely has that over her and though Beyonce is the superior vocalist, I prefer Janet's voice. What she lacks in raw singing ability she makes up for in emotion (same with Madonna to a lesser extent). Not only that but Beyonce seems to talk to a beat more than actually sing now even though despite being a good vocalist, her voice is still pretty standard and lacks the soul of her predecessors and some of her contemporaries. [Edited 2/24/17 13:08pm]
Yea... I disagree. As far as Beyoncé staccato singing I actually like that it reminds me of mj from bad on but I can get why people dislike that.

And you can even go as far back as jazz vocal scatting because staccato singing is what call "one note singing" delivered in a rhythmic arrangement/performance as opposed to elongated singing which is more melodic and technically how traditional singing is.

The problem with many, at least those who genuinely don't like Beyoncé's music, is that to this day, she's more contemporary than traditional in her approach to music. To the point that even when she tackle "traditional" music there is still echos and undertones of her contemporary stylings.

Beyonce is the female face of the rap-sing hybrid of vocal performing movement that took place in Contemporary Urban Music in the 90s, which blurs the lines between rapping and singing and help to merge R&B and Hip Hop. And those who don't like that, will never ever like or appreciate what Beyoncé does music and as consequently as an entertainer and her contributions to mainstream and her sub-genre.

Before I became a fan, I used to feel the same way. I hated "The Writing's On the Wall"(Destiny's Child Second Album) when it debuted because I can see that through it, R&B and Hip Hop though the vocal performance was being merged and blurred and I liked them separated. But once I became a fan, that was during Bey's 2nd album era(B'day), I could see how well she executed that vocal styling, giving new and fresh interpretations to the point where she can be influential with her approach while doing things that stood out and made it unique.

It's funny that you mention "The King" because to me, both of them and others before them as well even others after them(I say even others because MJ began his career long before Beyoncé and since Bey relatively a newbie in comparison to him though having her own longevity which is why these type of convos devolve the way they do) have contributed to progression of Contempory Black Vocal Performing that has been woven into the fabric of how that music sounds today. Contemporary Black Music is a rhythmic based musical genre and vocals are part of that.

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Reply #156 posted 03/15/17 2:23pm

Curtwill1975

Here is another thing, I can't speak for the rest of the Hive, I will only speak for myself and say that I would never put Beyoncé on the same level of MJ, Prince, and any of the legends that came before her because they have a greater legacy. Whatever Beyoncé have accomplished, it's because they paved the way for her to do it and the same can be said of the ones who came before her.

For example, what would Tina Turner be without Josephine Baker before her. What about Whitney, how would she be without Ella, Lena Horne and Aretha before her? What about Janet? Diana Ross among other black pop entertainers before her blazed a path for her to succeed. They were able to excel because of the contributions made by entertainers before and none of those things take away from their contributions whatsoever.

So why is it so hard to admit that Beyoncé, like her or not, is part of the fabric that has shaped Modern Mainstream Entertainment and be willing to have intelligent discussion about her contributions to them. For example, whether you like her approach to vocal performing, her vocal performers are part of how today's music sound. Contemporary R&B, specifically the Hip Hop/Pop/R&B sub-genre is a vocal-centric genre and Beyoncé tend to do things vocals that are influential but still sets her apart.

Like who else is using Operatic influenced arpeggiated vocals on a song like ***Flawless(And Trap/R&B song) as background vocals, for example? I mean, one of Beyoncé's main sonic signature is a heavy use of vocal background harmonies and how she uses them to create a vibe that connects to a lot of people who listen to her music. Why won't we ever discussions like that?

To me, her "legendary" status isn't about comparing her to what others have done before her or what she has accomplished in comparison to them but what her music has done in the landscape of shaping how the industry sounds and looks right now. Having her own legacy within the framework of that. That's the better and more appropiate discussion.

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Reply #157 posted 03/15/17 2:24pm

Curtwill1975

Curtwill1975 said:

heathilly said:

MotownSubdivision said: Yea... I disagree. As far as Beyoncé staccato singing I actually like that it reminds me of mj from bad on but I can get why people dislike that.

And you can even go as far back as jazz vocal scatting because staccato singing is what call "one note singing" delivered in a rhythmic arrangement/performance as opposed to elongated singing which is more melodic and technically how traditional singing is.

The problem with many, at least those who genuinely don't like Beyoncé's music, is that to this day, she's more contemporary than traditional in her approach to music. To the point that even when she tackle "traditional" music there is still echos and undertones of her contemporary stylings.

Beyonce is the female face of the rap-sing hybrid of vocal performing movement that took place in Contemporary Urban Music in the 90s, which blurs the lines between rapping and singing and help to merge R&B and Hip Hop. And those who don't like that, will never ever like or appreciate what Beyoncé does music and as consequently as an entertainer and her contributions to mainstream and her sub-genre.

Before I became a fan, I used to feel the same way. I hated "The Writing's On the Wall"(Destiny's Child Second Album) when it debuted because I can see that through it, R&B and Hip Hop though the vocal performance was being merged and blurred and I liked them separated. But once I became a fan, that was during Bey's 2nd album era(B'day), I could see how well she executed that vocal styling, giving new and fresh interpretations to the point where she can be influential with her approach while doing things that stood out and made it unique.

It's funny that you mention "The King" because to me, both of them and others before them as well even others after them(I say even others because MJ began his career long before Beyoncé and since Bey relatively a newbie in comparison to him though having her own longevity which is why these type of convos devolve the way they do) have contributed to progression of Contempory Black Vocal Performing that has been woven into the fabric of how that music sounds today. Contemporary Black Music is a rhythmic based musical genre and vocals are part of that.

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Reply #158 posted 03/15/17 11:42pm

heathilly

Curtwill1975 said:

Here is another thing, I can't speak for the rest of the Hive, I will only speak for myself and say that I would never put Beyoncé on the same level of MJ, Prince, and any of the legends that came before her because they have a greater legacy. Whatever Beyoncé have accomplished, it's because they paved the way for her to do it and the same can be said of the ones who came before her.



For example, what would Tina Turner be without Josephine Baker before her. What about Whitney, how would she be without Ella, Lena Horne and Aretha before her? What about Janet? Diana Ross among other black pop entertainers before her blazed a path for her to succeed. They were able to excel because of the contributions made by entertainers before and none of those things take away from their contributions whatsoever.



So why is it so hard to admit that Beyoncé, like her or not, is part of the fabric that has shaped Modern Mainstream Entertainment and be willing to have intelligent discussion about her contributions to them. For example, whether you like her approach to vocal performing, her vocal performers are part of how today's music sound. Contemporary R&B, specifically the Hip Hop/Pop/R&B sub-genre is a vocal-centric genre and Beyoncé tend to do things vocals that are influential but still sets her apart.



Like who else is using Operatic influenced arpeggiated vocals on a song like ***Flawless(And Trap/R&B song) as background vocals, for example? I mean, one of Beyoncé's main sonic signature is a heavy use of vocal background harmonies and how she uses them to create a vibe that connects to a lot of people who listen to her music. Why won't we ever discussions like that?



To me, her "legendary" status isn't about comparing her to what others have done before her or what she has accomplished in comparison to them but what her music has done in the landscape of shaping how the industry sounds and looks right now. Having her own legacy within the framework of that. That's the better and more appropiate discussion.


I like this. I like you your a good poster thoughtful and eloquently written observations.
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Reply #159 posted 03/16/17 11:26pm

214

heathilly said:

Curtwill1975 said:

Here is another thing, I can't speak for the rest of the Hive, I will only speak for myself and say that I would never put Beyoncé on the same level of MJ, Prince, and any of the legends that came before her because they have a greater legacy. Whatever Beyoncé have accomplished, it's because they paved the way for her to do it and the same can be said of the ones who came before her.

For example, what would Tina Turner be without Josephine Baker before her. What about Whitney, how would she be without Ella, Lena Horne and Aretha before her? What about Janet? Diana Ross among other black pop entertainers before her blazed a path for her to succeed. They were able to excel because of the contributions made by entertainers before and none of those things take away from their contributions whatsoever.

So why is it so hard to admit that Beyoncé, like her or not, is part of the fabric that has shaped Modern Mainstream Entertainment and be willing to have intelligent discussion about her contributions to them. For example, whether you like her approach to vocal performing, her vocal performers are part of how today's music sound. Contemporary R&B, specifically the Hip Hop/Pop/R&B sub-genre is a vocal-centric genre and Beyoncé tend to do things vocals that are influential but still sets her apart.

Like who else is using Operatic influenced arpeggiated vocals on a song like ***Flawless(And Trap/R&B song) as background vocals, for example? I mean, one of Beyoncé's main sonic signature is a heavy use of vocal background harmonies and how she uses them to create a vibe that connects to a lot of people who listen to her music. Why won't we ever discussions like that?

To me, her "legendary" status isn't about comparing her to what others have done before her or what she has accomplished in comparison to them but what her music has done in the landscape of shaping how the industry sounds and looks right now. Having her own legacy within the framework of that. That's the better and more appropiate discussion.

I like this. I like you your a good poster thoughtful and eloquently written observations.

I second that.

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Reply #160 posted 03/18/17 1:53pm

RJOrion

nah...article is pure hyperbole...and its not even her best album..."4" is...
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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > TIME Magazine chronicles the impact of Beyoncé's LEMONADE