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Thread started 06/23/17 4:17am

Militant

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*PURPLE RAIN DELUXE* - Packaging, Liner Notes & Media Reactions - Discuss

C-hEiCRXUAE4tN6.jpg





The long-awaited Purple Rain Deluxe
is out now.



You can listen on Spotify here. You can purchase it on Amazon, in your local record store, or via the official website at www.officialprincemusic.com


This thread is for discussing the packaging, liner notes, media reactions to the release and anything that doesn't fit in the other stickies.

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Reply #1 posted 06/23/17 4:45am

AndrewMc

Just finished reading Susan Rogers' liner notes. Nothing particularly new in what she says, but it's nicely done and heartfelt. Gives a nice overview to Prince's recording process and virtuosity.
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Reply #2 posted 06/23/17 6:08am

Ramzoo

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Too bad that Itunes didn't provide an Itunes LP as they usually do.....

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Reply #3 posted 06/23/17 9:36am

2freaky4church
1

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WE need a vault box. About ten cds, not greedy.

"2freaky is a complete stud." DJ
"2freaky is very down." 2Elijah.
"2freaky convinced me to join Antifa: OnlyNDA
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Reply #4 posted 06/23/17 12:18pm

djThunderfunk

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The packaging looks "pretty", but, I hate it. Seems so fragile and doesn't do much to protect the discs from getting scratched. I like the liner notes, both Susan's and the song notes from The Revoution. That said I like what is written but the layout is kind of ugly and some of Susan's that overlayed a picture instead of all black was too tiny and not enough contrast for these old eyes to easily read. Glad I did but, ouch.

2freaky doesn't go far enough, I want a 10CD + 2DVD box set that looks fancy and cool as a centerpiece displayed on my shelf.

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #5 posted 06/23/17 12:44pm

msicfan

Why am I crying? I should be happy. I am happy. He was just soooo alive!

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Reply #6 posted 06/23/17 2:20pm

msicfan

Okay; this is scary!!!! These releases and remasters are from someone who knows Prince all too well!!! Remember I said this!!!! Too many coincidences with these remasters and releases! Can someone give me more insight!?! It's like he's alive. I know he was an attention-getter! Wow, this album/remaster and new release is messing with my head! I have no mental illness and on no kind of meds. This is just too weird. I know I'm not the only one here who knows what I'm talking about!!!! These releases are ones that were not circulating!!! It's just too good! Or am I still in denial?!

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Reply #7 posted 06/23/17 2:23pm

rusty1

I'm happy that this PR deluxe finally came
out today..
I only have a few problems with this
historic release.
1) All day, all night, lust u always,
G-spot, Traffic Jam , Wednesday & Traffic
Jam had to be on here.
2) The two First Avenue shows are mentioned
In this booklet but not on this release.
I've got tbe First Avenue bootleg version
On tape but want a clear version.
Plus, this is where anyone first heard
This classic album live.
The First Ave B-day show i have on CD.
I'm dying to see this footage of that
Entire show released one day.
Is it possible that a true Deluxe of
Everything from this period will be
In our possession one day?
BOB4theFUNK
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Reply #8 posted 06/23/17 4:36pm

LoriJ

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Mine arrived today. I haven't been able to listen/ enjoy it yet. I ripped the 3 Cd's to my PC to preserve the originals. Let me tell you WB dropped the ball on this. The Cd's could not be read..unknown title, artist, no track listings. I just finished manually entering them all. It was a labor of love of course, but still! The foil packaging however is absolutely beautiful.

I love you baby, just not like I love this guitar.~Prince~
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Reply #9 posted 06/23/17 4:38pm

LoriJ

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djThunderfunk said:

The packaging looks "pretty", but, I hate it. Seems so fragile and doesn't do much to protect the discs from getting scratched. I like the liner notes, both Susan's and the song notes from The Revoution. That said I like what is written but the layout is kind of ugly and some of Susan's that overlayed a picture instead of all black was too tiny and not enough contrast for these old eyes to easily read. Glad I did but, ouch.

2freaky doesn't go far enough, I want a 10CD + 2DVD box set that looks fancy and cool as a centerpiece displayed on my shelf.

I'm grateful there were track listings large enough to see, so I could imput them.

I love you baby, just not like I love this guitar.~Prince~
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Reply #10 posted 06/23/17 4:41pm

LoriJ

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msicfan said:

Why am I crying? I should be happy. I am happy. He was just soooo alive!

I cried too, just hearing a few bars of Let's Go Crazy and Dance Electric while I was ripping the CD's. What an emotional release this was, so many memories.

I love you baby, just not like I love this guitar.~Prince~
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Reply #11 posted 06/23/17 8:40pm

EddieC

I hate the packaging. When I removed the plastic wrap, the disc fell out of the front flap, because for some reason it's open to the outside of the digipak as well as to the inside. So, that's just a disaster waiting to happen. I could have had a broken disc right at the beginning. Why didn't they just seal the outside of the thing?

Oh well. I don't intend to handle the physical object much, anyway.

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Reply #12 posted 06/23/17 10:09pm

laytonian

djThunderfunk said:

The packaging looks "pretty", but, I hate it. Seems so fragile and doesn't do much to protect the discs from getting scratched. I like the liner notes, both Susan's and the song notes from The Revoution. That said I like what is written but the layout is kind of ugly and some of Susan's that overlayed a picture instead of all black was too tiny and not enough contrast for these old eyes to easily read. Glad I did but, ouch.

2freaky doesn't go far enough, I want a 10CD + 2DVD box set that looks fancy and cool as a centerpiece displayed on my shelf.


.
Yes!
I had to get out a magnifying glass! What's wrong with black on white with a pretty border?
.
Welcome to "the org", laytonian… come bathe with me.
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Reply #13 posted 06/23/17 10:12pm

laytonian

LoriJ said:

Mine arrived today. I haven't been able to listen/ enjoy it yet. I ripped the 3 Cd's to my PC to preserve the originals. Let me tell you WB dropped the ball on this. The Cd's could not be read..unknown title, artist, no track listings. I just finished manually entering them all. It was a labor of love of course, but still! The foil packaging however is absolutely beautiful.


.
Jeez. I thought it was just me. I spent so much time renaming the files that I've not had a chance to listen yet.
.
But it's all I the PC and iPod now. Tomorrow, I make CDs for my Rover without an iPod dock.
.
Welcome to "the org", laytonian… come bathe with me.
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Reply #14 posted 06/23/17 10:14pm

laytonian

EddieC said:

I hate the packaging. When I removed the plastic wrap, the disc fell out of the front flap, because for some reason it's open to the outside of the digipak as well as to the inside. So, that's just a disaster waiting to happen. I could have had a broken disc right at the beginning. Why didn't they just seal the outside of the thing?

Oh well. I don't intend to handle the physical object much, anyway.


.
Same thing here!
I ended up ugly-fying it with scotch tape on the open end after the DVD feel out three times.
Who designed this package?
.
Welcome to "the org", laytonian… come bathe with me.
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Reply #15 posted 06/24/17 6:08am

partyup77

I compared the new vs the old poster that comes with the vinyl and they have cleaned up the image a bit. The old poster has more purple 'noise' in the background, especially on the bottom left. The new poster has a cleaner, whiter background.

Also, I have two old releases - one inner sleeve has the purple rain graphic background behind the lyrics, the other has the lake w sun reflection. The new copy has the lake image.

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Reply #16 posted 06/24/17 7:21am

McD

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I bought it despite saying I probably wouldn't if a digipak... fears were realised. Ordered from Amazon and it arrived crushed, spine and front cover damaged. It's going back. Fortunately Amazon allow MP3 downloads in the meantime.
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Reply #17 posted 06/24/17 9:44am

Neversin

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Cheap garbage fucking packaging with flashy silver look...
That shitty silver stuff will probably turn white when touched too much...
Like the contents of the liner notes, the way it's presented though, it looks like shit...

Neversin.

O(+>NIИ<+)O

“Is man merely a mistake of God's? Or God merely a mistake of man's?”

- Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
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Reply #18 posted 06/24/17 11:14am

bwaaatch

No problem with the digipack for me, but I found the typography and colour choices of the booklet to be poor. I don't think they really considered who would be reading this, and how. I sat down yesterday eve for a private listening session in a darkened room. Alas, the white out of black "modern" typeface has some severe legibility issues at this size and with this quality of printing. Even chucking on a bunch of spotlights only made it "readable", when what I was really hoping for was a more "deluxe" experience, something unhampered by such niggles. It should have been a very special moment for all of us.

Content of liner notes was fine, I thought (though Brownmark seemed to want to update the historical record about his input into the album -- though he may be justified in that for all I know).

I'd just like it if "deluxe" really did mean care and attention in all areas within the record company's sphere of influence.
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Reply #19 posted 06/24/17 11:16am

bwaaatch

To answer my points above (and a bunch of others across all the forums today), does any one think a super deluzlxenversion at three or four times the pr Ce might have merit and he the "true collectors' item" that this one isn't quite?
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Reply #20 posted 06/24/17 7:14pm

Doozer

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The content of the booklet is great. Wonderful writing by Susan Rogers and a real effort to involve The Revolution with their comments and memories of each song on the album. I would have loved the same commentary on the Vault disc and notes on the singles/edits/remixes.

Design-wise, the digipak format does not bother me at all. The discs came out, got ripped, and are going back into the packaging. I won't be referring to it often. The addition of silver/metallic ink to the piece is much nicer than the photography of the packaging let on. It does look like a special edition on the outside.

The booklet itself is not very considered. A reversed serif typeface makes it a miserable read, with quarter-inch margins that make the entire thing feel like a cramped mess. The photography looks dark and not color corrected. Maybe this was to "preserve the outtake photography," but it comes off as dull and gray, not celebratory, which is what this release is all about. I love that the unseen photos were used, even if they are all pretty similar, but they need a bit of post-processing. Not Joshua Welton level processing, but a careful touch to bring the life out of them.

I also would have liked to see stills from the film in the booklet. This is a soundtrack album, and aside from the cover, that's not even considered in the artwork.

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Reply #21 posted 06/25/17 9:25am

peterg34217

Has anyone else noticed breathe in the purple rain instead of bathe? Lame
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Reply #22 posted 06/25/17 11:46am

luvgirl

At first I was disappointed with the packaging, I don't know why I was expecting a box set, lol. The more I looked at it though, It grew on me. I think it's cute. It's a precious commodity. yes
I just want you here, I just want you near me baby, cause I'm scared I'll cry, I love you like crazy.
~RIP~
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Reply #23 posted 06/25/17 2:19pm

Latin

Check out the review by The New Yorker entitled "Prince’s Purple Downpour: A Review of the Expanded “Purple Rain”":

http://www.newyorker.com/...e-rain/amp
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Reply #24 posted 06/25/17 5:49pm

Goddess4Real

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It's pretty good.....but I wish they included the G-Spot demo, which was in the original script....why leave it out?

[Edited 6/25/17 17:51pm]

Keep Calm & Listen To Prince
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Reply #25 posted 06/25/17 6:16pm

laurarichardso
n

LoriJ said:

Mine arrived today. I haven't been able to listen/ enjoy it yet. I ripped the 3 Cd's to my PC to preserve the originals. Let me tell you WB dropped the ball on this. The Cd's could not be read..unknown title, artist, no track listings. I just finished manually entering them all. It was a labor of love of course, but still! The foil packaging however is absolutely beautiful.


Lord how cheap can they have been. At least all of the info shows up in Tidal. This is much more cheap ass then I even imagined.
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Reply #26 posted 06/25/17 7:56pm

Latin

Check out this video produced by Super Deluxe Edition. In it, they compare it with other similar packages by other artists.

Here it is:

http://www.superdeluxeedi...-unboxing/
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Reply #27 posted 06/25/17 8:58pm

starkitty

Apparently Jill got no credit on the vault songs?
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Reply #28 posted 06/25/17 10:56pm

TXfan

I love it all. Ordered mine on Amazon and it included a digital copy on Amazon Music. The cd/dvd expanded version was put together nicely and the liner notes were a great addition to the set. I'm sure there's more to come, give them a chance.
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Reply #29 posted 06/25/17 11:26pm

Nikkie

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Great review by Pitchfork (10/10)

http://pitchfork.com/revi...ition/amp/

BY: BRAD NELSON JUN 26 2017
POP/R&BROCK
In 1984, Purple Rain turned Prince into a global superstar, and the 3xCD remaster of the canonical record adds an entire disc of previously unreleased music cut during the same period.
In so much of his music, Prince seemed fixated on contradictions. He used the album format to position seemingly alienated concepts against each other—spirituality and sexuality, of course, but also isolation and collaboration, minimalism and maximalism, life and afterlife. He longed to connect these ideas, to isolate the points at which they melted into each other. The soundtrack for his 1984 movie Purple Rain represented the most precise implosion of his internal contradictions—sex, religious devotion, empathy, alienation. The album is a kind of geode of identity, a product of remarkable individual pressurization.

Purple Rain — Deluxe Expanded Edition is the first reissue produced by the deal Prince signed with Warner Brothers in 2014 in order to regain ownership of his masters. This edition’s approach to the original LP is to kind of unfold it from the edges by including unreleased songs and extended mixes that both expand and complicate the record’s essential character. Purple Rain was Prince’s commercial flashpoint, an album- and feature-length metaphor for his arrival on a national stage; in the last 33 years, it has been written about breathlessly (Carvell Wallace reconsidered it here just last year, one of a series of reviews published after Prince’s death), and it has been contemplated down to its skeletal details. The remastering job heard on this edition, apparently overseen by Prince, adds a clarity and fluorescence to an album whose elements already sounded carefully distributed. Prince’s screams in “Baby I’m a Star” take shape in three dimensions, and the interlaced guitar lines in “Darling Nikki” sound as if they're radiating their own humidity. The songs feel heavier and fuller and conversely, the void surrounding the guitar chord that introduces the title track feels as if it’s been expanded into an even vaster loneliness.

As good as the remaster sounds, the primary attraction of this edition is its second disc, 11 tracks from Prince’s vault of unreleased songs, all cut between 1983 to 1984. Prince wrote and recorded constantly for his entire career, and only a fraction of his music has found its way onto his official records. He only issued two archival compilations in his lifetime, 1998’s Crystal Ball and 1999’s The Vault: Old Friends 4 Sale, where many of the songs recovered from the archives were altered, remixed, or re-recorded. Original versions of vault songs have tended to circulate among Prince fans through bootlegs or live recordings, where they would appear full of crackling and hissing artifacts, or would seem to be playing from a considerable distance, muted and cottony, as if they had barely escaped their source. (My bootleg mp3 copy of the 12-minute “Computer Blue” only occasionally verges on listenable.) On the Deluxe Edition of Purple Rain, the vault tracks sound like fully-formed Prince songs—animated, vibrant, reflexive, fluid, almost vehicular in their design and velocity, as if the motorcycle on the album cover were sculpted according to the songs’ sleek and slightly alien shapes. Whether Prince is constructing busy hydraulic cylinders of funk (“Love and Sex”) or drawing a few scribbles in empty space (“We Can Fuck”), one hears every detail with a previously inaccessible focus.

There’s a playfulness that animates tracks performed entirely by Prince; “Electric Intercourse,” a decaying piano ballad in the mold of “The Beautiful Ones,” is sung almost entirely in the unstable region between his falsetto and his scream. On “Possessed,” his vocal seems to never reach the earth, weaving a sinuous arc through the air. “Gosh, I love it when the horns blow,” he says just before the breakdown, “Everybody watch me dance!”; the drums recede and the “horns” turn out to be a synth figure pulsing in the center of a vacuum. But as much as Purple Rain is the sound of Prince achieving critical and commercial supremacy, it’s also the sound of his band, the Revolution, solidifying as a unit, reshaping Prince’s music as they played it. The best of the unreleased songs either feel intended for the Revolution or involve them directly, seeming to form their compositions out of the electric and ambiguous flow of the band’s interplay.

Among the most startling moments in this vein is found on “Our Destiny / Roadhouse Garden,” when the strings and drums evaporate and Revolution keyboardist Lisa Coleman says, “Look, I’m not saying let’s get married or nothing, I’m not ready to settle down, and I don’t want to have your baby, but you’ve got to be the finest specimen I’ve ever seen.” Prince, Lisa, and Wendy Melvoin share buoyant harmonies on the perfectly-named “Wonderful Ass,” in which subject of the song is so lost in peripheral distractions (“You do not understand my quirky ways/My crazy logic leaves you in a daze/You think my neurosis is just a phase”) that the chorus— “You’ve got a wonderful ass”—almost feels like a non-sequitur. The complete, 12-minute version of “Computer Blue,” the only song on Purple Rain credited to Prince, Wendy, and Lisa, digresses into a series of melting guitar solos, and then again into a more formal funk exercise, and then dissolves further from there into a kind of short story, told by Prince, in which he describes someone who lives in a house with many hallways. “It was a long walk to his bedroom,” Prince says, “because to him each hallway represented an emotion, every one vastly different from the next.” He assigns each hallway its appropriate emotional designation: “lust,” “fear,” “insecurity,” and finally, “hate.”

The most revelatory track from the vault is “We Can Fuck,” which appeared later in a different form as “We Can Funk” on the soundtrack for Prince’s movie Graffiti Bridge. To listen to the Graffiti Bridge version and then to its original 10-minute arrangement is to hear the song unfold backwards through time. Prince worked on the song from 1983 to 1990, adding and subtracting different textures; the Graffiti Bridge version is ultimately aided by George Clinton, a horn section, and an additional chorus which aligns the song with the more communal design of a Parliament-Funkadelic song. The original “We Can Fuck,” however, gets so deep into Prince territory that its pre-breakdown section ends with him arranging his voice into harmonized screams. “Oh, the Kama Sutra,” he sings against a slowly developing groove that eventually consumes the entire song, “I can rewrite it in half as many words.” It builds and falls apart and builds again, synths whirling and floating with the choreography of leaves, flowing around Prince’s multiplied voice and transforming what once felt like a minor funk digression into one of his best tracks. Its placement, before Prince’s somber and sinuous recording of a piano piece his dad wrote (“Father’s Song”), gives the second disc the integrity of a lost Prince album, one in which the listener seems to follow him beyond his hits and even his album-length statements, to the very edges of his sensibility.

The third disc of the set focuses on another dense layer of Prince’s discography, the 12-inch mixes that considerably expand and warp the shape of his singles. Where extended versions of songs initially served a utilitarian purpose for DJs—longer versions of songs allowed for more relaxed and precise transitions—Prince saw the space afforded by a 12-inch as a kind of Möbius strip; his extended remixes tend to drift and twist away from themselves as they go. Listening to these songs, one has the feeling of rocketing through membranes, the compositions always opening up onto some new internal space. “Erotic City,” a B-side that inadvertently ascended into radio playlists, is stretched out into seven-and-a-half minutes of sheer mechanical austerity in its “Make Love Not War Erotic City Come Alive” mix, where the composition is often reduced to synthetic and percussive blinks, vocals curving through the empty space between each snare. The extended remix of “I Would Die 4 U” is 10 minutes long and weirdly doesn’t play at all with the original recording’s texture; it’s a live performance taken from one of the Revolution’s rehearsals. The song builds relentlessly, always seeming to unlock an extra room of itself, particularly when Eddie M’s saxophone starts fluttering through the substance of the track.

The third disc also includes single edits, which are less imaginative and constantly unfolding than they are extremely, arbitrarily folded down. Prince reportedly prepared at least 100 songs for Purple Rain, so the new set is hardly comprehensive, and one wonders what else could’ve been included in lieu of a 7-inch edit of “Take Me with U.” The reissue specifically lacks “Wednesday,” which appeared on one of the earliest configurations of the Purple Rain tracklisting, as well as the full 11-minute version of the title track, performed at a 1983 show at First Avenue, out of which Prince carved the album version.

That legendary concert was the Revolution’s first show with Melvoin; she plays “Purple Rain”’s central chord progression, engineering and manipulating all of the emptiness around it. In the narrative flow of the album and film, which migrates from desire to jealousy to personal and professional breakdown, Prince finally embraces an expression of empathy, which also seems to flow inexorably from all of the previous expressions. There’s no radical shift in structure in the 11-minute recording; it just sort of wanders through its changes forever, one’s sense of time dislocating around it. In the center of the performance, Prince’s concerns about beginnings and endings, of birth and death seem to dissolve and fold into its ambulatory drift. This is Prince’s afterworld, the timeless space he sought to access in his own music, and it’s as close as he ever got to portraying it in performance and on record.
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