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Reply #30 posted 03/19/17 4:27pm

AnonymousFan

purplerabbithole said:

I like many of Prince's lyrics. Don't get me wrong. They are often funny, sexy, romantic, descriptive, colorful, dirty in the best sense, spiritual and introspective. They can also have good narrative structure.

But they also could be off in left field, politically confusing, too religious for their own good, trashy in worst sense and repetitive.

Anyway, we were talking in another thread about some of Prince's half assed notions, paranoid conspiracy theories, and 'ignorant' beliefs which all exemplify the expression "A little learning is a dangerous thing."

PRince had a naturally quick brain, a wit, a prying mind, and even a sensitivity. Imagine what he could have done with this natural ability if he had more formal education, less religious doctrine shoved down his throat by father figures (yes LG and daddy Nelson) and a slighly more humanist rather than spiritual take on his talent.

I don't mind spirituality or a belief that music has spiritual elements to it...but Prince being a vessel for the music of God stuff at times stiffled his creativity. Insulated him. A great lyricist reads novels not conspiracy books. They read the Bible but they also read Shakespeare.

I think his personal issues at times got in the way of his lyricism. I wish someone could have kidnapped him for a year (or better yet convinced him) to sit down and read 100 of the best poems ever written and ten great history books with various POV (not just Afrocentric ones) on one subject he was passionate about.

[Edited 3/18/17 22:27pm]

His music would've sucked if he went making agnostic, politically neutral music. Lyricism is personal - it comes from a persons beliefs. If you change the beliefs you change the person and the music. If you want leftist, atheistic music, go make that crap yourself or turn on your radio. But, don't get butthurt because someone more talented than you didn't push your beliefs.

Prince didn't make make music for you, he made it for himself more than anyone. If you happen to like it that's fine, but don't act like you have any weight whatsoever on content that "should've been".

[Edited 3/19/17 16:37pm]

[Edited 3/19/17 16:38pm]

[Edited 3/19/17 16:39pm]

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Reply #31 posted 03/19/17 4:44pm

DonRants

Well said AnonamouseFan. I could not disagree with purplerabbithole more. Bob Marley is considered one of the greatest lyricist ever. He was religious and afrocentric. The truth is as different as Prince and Bob were they both spoke their truth.That is what matters.

purplerabbithole said:

I like many of Prince's lyrics. Don't get me wrong. They are often funny, sexy, romantic, descriptive, colorful, dirty in the best sense, spiritual and introspective. They can also have good narrative structure.

But they also could be off in left field, politically confusing, too religious for their own good, trashy in worst sense and repetitive.

Anyway, we were talking in another thread about some of Prince's half assed notions, paranoid conspiracy theories, and 'ignorant' beliefs which all exemplify the expression "A little learning is a dangerous thing."

PRince had a naturally quick brain, a wit, a prying mind, and even a sensitivity. Imagine what he could have done with this natural ability if he had more formal education, less religious doctrine shoved down his throat by father figures (yes LG and daddy Nelson) and a slighly more humanist rather than spiritual take on his talent.

I don't mind spirituality or a belief that music has spiritual elements to it...but Prince being a vessel for the music of God stuff at times stiffled his creativity. Insulated him. A great lyricist reads novels not conspiracy books. They read the Bible but they also read Shakespeare.

I think his personal issues at times got in the way of his lyricism. I wish someone could have kidnapped him for a year (or better yet convinced him) to sit down and read 100 of the best poems ever written and ten great history books with various POV (not just Afrocentric ones) on one subject he was passionate about.

[Edited 3/18/17 22:27pm]

To All the Haters on the Internet
No more Candy 4 U
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Reply #32 posted 03/19/17 5:00pm

purplerabbitho
le

NIce job putting words in my mouth. I am not saying his lyrics are inferior at times because they are spiritual. I have nothing against afrocentric beliefs. How many times do I have to say that?

I am saying that the preachiness, condesending tone, and lack of clarity in songs like Colonized Mind, the repetition of themes (too many party songs in his later years), the preachiness of the Rainbrow Children---I could have gone without. Do I have to like all Prince songs. What's wrong with wishing he branched out a bit in his themes. I don't like preachy prince. I don't mind spiritual Prince. I don't like Prince when he bitches about having to pay taxes and talks down to his audience. I dont mind when he expresses a love for his race and his faith.

Some of my favorite songs (lyrics and musically) are...

the Love We Make

Anna Stesia

Black Muse

Black Sweat

Revelation

The Cross

Dreamer (even with its paranoia, it doesn't offend me and he dropped the lyrics about chemtrails in later performances.)

Way Back HOme

The Question of U

Beautiful, Loved and Blessed

Dear Mr. Man (actually the song to me is about helplessness, not about actually writing a letter)

I dont even mind Avalanche (even though it ignores the fact that LIncoln was helpful to getting the 13th amendment passed).

All of these songs have afrocentric themes or spirituality in them. But they aren't preachy or overly paranoid or contained over done themes (like "life of the Party" --what a shitty song. What kind of party is he having..a church picnic.?}

AnonymousFan said:

purplerabbithole said:

I like many of Prince's lyrics. Don't get me wrong. They are often funny, sexy, romantic, descriptive, colorful, dirty in the best sense, spiritual and introspective. They can also have good narrative structure.

But they also could be off in left field, politically confusing, too religious for their own good, trashy in worst sense and repetitive.

Anyway, we were talking in another thread about some of Prince's half assed notions, paranoid conspiracy theories, and 'ignorant' beliefs which all exemplify the expression "A little learning is a dangerous thing."

PRince had a naturally quick brain, a wit, a prying mind, and even a sensitivity. Imagine what he could have done with this natural ability if he had more formal education, less religious doctrine shoved down his throat by father figures (yes LG and daddy Nelson) and a slighly more humanist rather than spiritual take on his talent.

I don't mind spirituality or a belief that music has spiritual elements to it...but Prince being a vessel for the music of God stuff at times stiffled his creativity. Insulated him. A great lyricist reads novels not conspiracy books. They read the Bible but they also read Shakespeare.

I think his personal issues at times got in the way of his lyricism. I wish someone could have kidnapped him for a year (or better yet convinced him) to sit down and read 100 of the best poems ever written and ten great history books with various POV (not just Afrocentric ones) on one subject he was passionate about.

[Edited 3/18/17 22:27pm]

His music would've sucked if he went making agnostic, politically neutral music. Lyricism is personal - it comes from a persons beliefs. If you change the beliefs you change the person and the music. If you want leftist, atheistic music, go make that crap yourself or turn on your radio. But, don't get butthurt because someone more talented than you didn't push your beliefs.

Prince didn't make make music for you, he made it for himself more than anyone. If you happen to like it that's fine, but don't act like you have any weight whatsoever on content that "should've been".

[Edited 3/19/17 16:37pm]

[Edited 3/19/17 16:38pm]

[Edited 3/19/17 16:39pm]

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Reply #33 posted 03/19/17 5:02pm

purplerabbitho
le

At times it felt less like Prince's truth and more like JW's indoctrination. That's my issue. Hoping he could arrive at his truth by branching out a bit is not the same thing as dictating his truth...if that makes sense.

Nothing against religious or afrocentric themes. I can't say this enough. Just think there is more.

DonRants said:

Well said AnonamouseFan. I could not disagree with purplerabbithole more. Bob Marley is considered one of the greatest lyricist ever. He was religious and afrocentric. The truth is as different as Prince and Bob were they both spoke their truth.That is what matters.

purplerabbithole said:

I like many of Prince's lyrics. Don't get me wrong. They are often funny, sexy, romantic, descriptive, colorful, dirty in the best sense, spiritual and introspective. They can also have good narrative structure.

But they also could be off in left field, politically confusing, too religious for their own good, trashy in worst sense and repetitive.

Anyway, we were talking in another thread about some of Prince's half assed notions, paranoid conspiracy theories, and 'ignorant' beliefs which all exemplify the expression "A little learning is a dangerous thing."

PRince had a naturally quick brain, a wit, a prying mind, and even a sensitivity. Imagine what he could have done with this natural ability if he had more formal education, less religious doctrine shoved down his throat by father figures (yes LG and daddy Nelson) and a slighly more humanist rather than spiritual take on his talent.

I don't mind spirituality or a belief that music has spiritual elements to it...but Prince being a vessel for the music of God stuff at times stiffled his creativity. Insulated him. A great lyricist reads novels not conspiracy books. They read the Bible but they also read Shakespeare.

I think his personal issues at times got in the way of his lyricism. I wish someone could have kidnapped him for a year (or better yet convinced him) to sit down and read 100 of the best poems ever written and ten great history books with various POV (not just Afrocentric ones) on one subject he was passionate about.

[Edited 3/18/17 22:27pm]

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Reply #34 posted 03/19/17 5:38pm

1725topp

purplerabbithole said:

At times it felt less like Prince's truth and more like JW's indoctrination. That's my issue. Hoping he could arrive at his truth by branching out a bit is not the same thing as dictating his truth...if that makes sense.

Nothing against religious or afrocentric themes. I can't say this enough. Just think there is more.

DonRants said:

Well said AnonamouseFan. I could not disagree with purplerabbithole more. Bob Marley is considered one of the greatest lyricist ever. He was religious and afrocentric. The truth is as different as Prince and Bob were they both spoke their truth.That is what matters.

*

I probably just don't understand what you are saying. I highlighted your statement, "Just think there is more." Yes, more for you, but not more for Prince. And, I guess my confusion is that I never wish my desires on a particular artist. I tend to enjoy what I like from a particular artist and ignore what I dislike from a particular artist. And maybe as a poet and short story writer, myself, I'm not interested in having someone create what I think is missing. As Toni Morrison said, her goal is to write the book that needs to be written rather than waiting for someone else to write it. So rather than bemoaning what one artist isn’t doing, I either search for an artist that is doing that or I create it myself. Now, I'll admit, being a spiritual and Afrocentric person, those topics speak to me. However, I always felt and still think that "Race" is a childish or myopic notion of history, even though it has a nice groove. Yet, because I find the lyrics of "Race" childish, I don't sit around wishing that he didn't write it. The law of averages dictates that even if a genius writes enough songs some of them will be crappy. I just enjoy the songs that I like and rarely listen to “Race.”

*

Ultimately, as someone else has stated, what I like most about Prince is that musically and lyrically he was always changing, growing, developing, almost never doing what was expected of him. And while one can argue that he allowed his personal issues to invade if not limit his topics, I can argue that most artists are self-indulgent to a degree. Yet, most fans/listeners tend only to have a problem with that self-indulgence when the topics or position is against their position or interests. Yet, I like most of the music that Prince created; I dislike some of it, especially anything that sounds like house music. (House music offends my sensibilities, and I feel that anyone who created house music should apologize for offending my sensibilities.) I agree with a good deal of his lyrical positions; I disagree with some of it. As such, I'm just glad that I was able to engage/experience an artist who created music that moved me and lyrics that made me laugh, empathize, and think. I don't know what more I could want from my favorite artist. I ignore when he’s discussing chemtrails, and I say “right on” when I’m listening to “Sexuality,” “Party Up,” “We March,” “Ole Skool Company,” “Black Muse,” and “Dear Mr. Man.”

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Reply #35 posted 03/19/17 5:55pm

purplerabbitho
le

I see your point. I guess my point is that he is a lyricist...not just a musician. He put all his time into expanding the sound of his music that he was a bit of a musical expert. Well, it stands to reason that a lyricist would be a voracious reader of all kind of fictional works. It just bothers me that I can't find proof of actual literature from Prince. That seems odd to me that a wordsmith with his wit would limit himself to history books, conspiracy theories, and spirtual texts.

I did find one tidbit...a musican stated that prince had taken one of his bands to a poetry reading.

1725topp said:

purplerabbithole said:

At times it felt less like Prince's truth and more like JW's indoctrination. That's my issue. Hoping he could arrive at his truth by branching out a bit is not the same thing as dictating his truth...if that makes sense.

Nothing against religious or afrocentric themes. I can't say this enough. Just think there is more.

*

I probably just don't understand what you are saying. I highlighted your statement, "Just think there is more." Yes, more for you, but not more for Prince. And, I guess my confusion is that I never wish my desires on a particular artist. I tend to enjoy what I like from a particular artist and ignore what I dislike from a particular artist. And maybe as a poet and short story writer, myself, I'm not interested in having someone create what I think is missing. As Toni Morrison said, her goal is to write the book that needs to be written rather than waiting for someone else to write it. So rather than bemoaning what one artist isn’t doing, I either search for an artist that is doing that or I create it myself. Now, I'll admit, being a spiritual and Afrocentric person, those topics speak to me. However, I always felt and still think that "Race" is a childish or myopic notion of history, even though it has a nice groove. Yet, because I find the lyrics of "Race" childish, I don't sit around wishing that he didn't write it. The law of averages dictates that even if a genius writes enough songs some of them will be crappy. I just enjoy the songs that I like and rarely listen to “Race.”

*

Ultimately, as someone else has stated, what I like most about Prince is that musically and lyrically he was always changing, growing, developing, almost never doing what was expected of him. And while one can argue that he allowed his personal issues to invade if not limit his topics, I can argue that most artists are self-indulgent to a degree. Yet, most fans/listeners tend only to have a problem with that self-indulgence when the topics or position is against their position or interests. Yet, I like most of the music that Prince created; I dislike some of it, especially anything that sounds like house music. (House music offends my sensibilities, and I feel that anyone who created house music should apologize for offending my sensibilities.) I agree with a good deal of his lyrical positions; I disagree with some of it. As such, I'm just glad that I was able to engage/experience an artist who created music that moved me and lyrics that made me laugh, empathize, and think. I don't know what more I could want from my favorite artist. I ignore when he’s discussing chemtrails, and I say “right on” when I’m listening to “Sexuality,” “Party Up,” “We March,” “Ole Skool Company,” “Black Muse,” and “Dear Mr. Man.”

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Reply #36 posted 03/19/17 7:58pm

214

I used to feel the same about Michael Jackson, but i don't anymore or at least not as much as i did before, to the point to get mad at him for not writing more mature things. But they are what they are, that's what they had to offer, and we have to accept that, that's the beauty about art in general.

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Reply #37 posted 03/19/17 8:00pm

214

FlyOnTheWall said:

The only lyrical "improvement" I can imagine for Prince is a song written about me, preferably with my name in the title, leaving no room for uncertainty. nod falloff

lol lol

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Reply #38 posted 03/19/17 11:08pm

1725topp

purplerabbithole said:

I see your point. I guess my point is that he is a lyricist...not just a musician. He put all his time into expanding the sound of his music that he was a bit of a musical expert. Well, it stands to reason that a lyricist would be a voracious reader of all kind of fictional works. It just bothers me that I can't find proof of actual literature from Prince. That seems odd to me that a wordsmith with his wit would limit himself to history books, conspiracy theories, and spirtual texts.

I did find one tidbit...a musican stated that prince had taken one of his bands to a poetry reading.

1725topp said:

*

I probably just don't understand what you are saying. I highlighted your statement, "Just think there is more." Yes, more for you, but not more for Prince. And, I guess my confusion is that I never wish my desires on a particular artist. I tend to enjoy what I like from a particular artist and ignore what I dislike from a particular artist. And maybe as a poet and short story writer, myself, I'm not interested in having someone create what I think is missing. As Toni Morrison said, her goal is to write the book that needs to be written rather than waiting for someone else to write it. So rather than bemoaning what one artist isn’t doing, I either search for an artist that is doing that or I create it myself. Now, I'll admit, being a spiritual and Afrocentric person, those topics speak to me. However, I always felt and still think that "Race" is a childish or myopic notion of history, even though it has a nice groove. Yet, because I find the lyrics of "Race" childish, I don't sit around wishing that he didn't write it. The law of averages dictates that even if a genius writes enough songs some of them will be crappy. I just enjoy the songs that I like and rarely listen to “Race.”

*

Ultimately, as someone else has stated, what I like most about Prince is that musically and lyrically he was always changing, growing, developing, almost never doing what was expected of him. And while one can argue that he allowed his personal issues to invade if not limit his topics, I can argue that most artists are self-indulgent to a degree. Yet, most fans/listeners tend only to have a problem with that self-indulgence when the topics or position is against their position or interests. Yet, I like most of the music that Prince created; I dislike some of it, especially anything that sounds like house music. (House music offends my sensibilities, and I feel that anyone who created house music should apologize for offending my sensibilities.) I agree with a good deal of his lyrical positions; I disagree with some of it. As such, I'm just glad that I was able to engage/experience an artist who created music that moved me and lyrics that made me laugh, empathize, and think. I don't know what more I could want from my favorite artist. I ignore when he’s discussing chemtrails, and I say “right on” when I’m listening to “Sexuality,” “Party Up,” “We March,” “Ole Skool Company,” “Black Muse,” and “Dear Mr. Man.”

*

Prince made references to literary writers or works, such as poet Dorothy Parker and Gil Scott-Heron's "The Revolution Will not Be Televised" among others. The noticeable aspect about each song is that those songs don't just mention Parker or Scott-Heron's work, but the songs actually mimic the style of the writers. As such, "The Ballad of Dorothy Parker" mimics the wit and sparseness for which Parker is known. And, chant/chorus of "The War" tropes the title and aggressive mood of Scott-Heron's "The Revolution Will not Be Televised" to build his own doom's day myth/warning. Additionally, if I remember correctly, in The Lyrics of Prince, the author, C. Liegh McInnis, makes several literary connections as well as shows Prince's use of various literary devices. Also, in one printed interview about working with Prince, McInnis stated that he had discussions with Prince regarding Ayn Ryan's Atlas Shrugged and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, though I'm not sure we can find any direct referencing of each in Prince's work. So, maybe you are seeking specific kinds of literary references, but, as I remember, Prince was quite masterful with imagery (metaphors and similes) as well as with narrative form, when he desired to be. In many cases, a writer will not "name-check" a work but will trope a writer's style, which is what Prince seems to do most. So, again, maybe you are seeking a particular literary style or particular literary influence, but it seems that Prince was very much influenced by "literary" writers. Now, how masterful his use of their influence can be debated, but I think that Prince's best uses of literary devices—“Sign ‘O’ the Times,” “1999,” “Little Red Corvette,” “Starfish and Coffee,” “Around the World in a Day,” “Condition of the Heart,” etc.—are on par with some of the best pop writers, including Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Smokey Robinson, and Stevie Wonder.

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Reply #39 posted 03/19/17 11:22pm

Iamtheorg

avatar

Oh great. Another Prince is ignorant and needs the two white girls to teach him the ways of the world subtle racist idiot. Sit your ass down somewhere.

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Reply #40 posted 03/20/17 12:26am

purplerabbitho
le

What two white girls?

Iamtheorg said:

Oh great. Another Prince is ignorant and needs the two white girls to teach him the ways of the world subtle racist idiot. Sit your ass down somewhere.

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Reply #41 posted 03/20/17 12:37am

purplerabbitho
le

purplerabbithole said:

What two white girls? Wendy and Lisa? Ask OldFriends4Sale what I used to write about the Revolution/Eric Leeds taking too much credit for his work and claiming that they introduced him to the Beatles and real jazz. I was actually pissed about their Reunion for a little while.

Will you chill, please. I am not a racist. My wishing prince had read a larger variety books than the ones shown at Paisley is because I was an English teacher and majored in English Secondary Education and Creative Writing. I might be an intellectual snob but I am not a racist. One more time --I actually like that he read African History. I dislike the conspiracy theorist from Britain (white dude) and that white chick who wrote about her near death experience.

Iamtheorg said:

Oh great. Another Prince is ignorant and needs the two white girls to teach him the ways of the world subtle racist idiot. Sit your ass down somewhere.

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Reply #42 posted 03/20/17 12:40am

purplerabbitho
le

purplerabbithole said:

That's a leap. I never claimed that PRince needed anyone in his band to tell him what to read.

Oh great. Another Prince is ignorant and needs the two white girls to teach him the ways of the world subtle racist idiot. Sit your ass down somewhere.

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Reply #43 posted 03/20/17 12:43am

purplerabbitho
le

Cool thanks for the info. I hope he didn't like Ayn Rand...I can't stand her. Ralph Ellison is cool though.

1725topp said:

purplerabbithole said:

I see your point. I guess my point is that he is a lyricist...not just a musician. He put all his time into expanding the sound of his music that he was a bit of a musical expert. Well, it stands to reason that a lyricist would be a voracious reader of all kind of fictional works. It just bothers me that I can't find proof of actual literature from Prince. That seems odd to me that a wordsmith with his wit would limit himself to history books, conspiracy theories, and spirtual texts.

I did find one tidbit...a musican stated that prince had taken one of his bands to a poetry reading.

*

Prince made references to literary writers or works, such as poet Dorothy Parker and Gil Scott-Heron's "The Revolution Will not Be Televised" among others. The noticeable aspect about each song is that those songs don't just mention Parker or Scott-Heron's work, but the songs actually mimic the style of the writers. As such, "The Ballad of Dorothy Parker" mimics the wit and sparseness for which Parker is known. And, chant/chorus of "The War" tropes the title and aggressive mood of Scott-Heron's "The Revolution Will not Be Televised" to build his own doom's day myth/warning. Additionally, if I remember correctly, in The Lyrics of Prince, the author, C. Liegh McInnis, makes several literary connections as well as shows Prince's use of various literary devices. Also, in one printed interview about working with Prince, McInnis stated that he had discussions with Prince regarding Ayn Ryan's Atlas Shrugged and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, though I'm not sure we can find any direct referencing of each in Prince's work. So, maybe you are seeking specific kinds of literary references, but, as I remember, Prince was quite masterful with imagery (metaphors and similes) as well as with narrative form, when he desired to be. In many cases, a writer will not "name-check" a work but will trope a writer's style, which is what Prince seems to do most. So, again, maybe you are seeking a particular literary style or particular literary influence, but it seems that Prince was very much influenced by "literary" writers. Now, how masterful his use of their influence can be debated, but I think that Prince's best uses of literary devices—“Sign ‘O’ the Times,” “1999,” “Little Red Corvette,” “Starfish and Coffee,” “Around the World in a Day,” “Condition of the Heart,” etc.—are on par with some of the best pop writers, including Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Smokey Robinson, and Stevie Wonder.

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Reply #44 posted 03/20/17 2:24am

NorthC

It's all "what if" history.
[Edited 3/20/17 2:26am]
Even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked.
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Reply #45 posted 03/20/17 5:36am

RJOrion

Iamtheorg said:

Oh great. Another Prince is ignorant and needs the two white girls to teach him the ways of the world subtle racist idiot. Sit your ass down somewhere.





LMAO...word
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Reply #46 posted 03/20/17 7:01pm

Lovejunky

avatar

FlyOnTheWall said:

The only lyrical "improvement" I can imagine for Prince is a song written about me, preferably with my name in the title, leaving no room for uncertainty. nod falloff

Hahaha

highfive

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #47 posted 03/20/17 7:26pm

Lovejunky

avatar

purplerabbithole said:

I like many of Prince's lyrics. Don't get me wrong. They are often funny, sexy, romantic, descriptive, colorful, dirty in the best sense, spiritual and introspective. They can also have good narrative structure.

But they also could be off in left field, politically confusing, too religious for their own good, trashy in worst sense and repetitive.

Anyway, we were talking in another thread about some of Prince's half assed notions, paranoid conspiracy theories, and 'ignorant' beliefs which all exemplify the expression "A little learning is a dangerous thing."

PRince had a naturally quick brain, a wit, a prying mind, and even a sensitivity. Imagine what he could have done with this natural ability if he had more formal education, less religious doctrine shoved down his throat by father figures (yes LG and daddy Nelson) and a slighly more humanist rather than spiritual take on his talent.

I don't mind spirituality or a belief that music has spiritual elements to it...but Prince being a vessel for the music of God stuff at times stiffled his creativity. Insulated him. A great lyricist reads novels not conspiracy books. They read the Bible but they also read Shakespeare.

I think his personal issues at times got in the way of his lyricism. I wish someone could have kidnapped him for a year (or better yet convinced him) to sit down and read 100 of the best poems ever written and ten great history books with various POV (not just Afrocentric ones) on one subject he was passionate about.

[Edited 3/18/17 22:27pm]

I get what you are saying..However I Disagree in the sense that Prince was an incredible Lyricist.

his Particular gift was the he was Very Word Economic..

some of the Phrases he left behind are like Written Pictures....

You can take any one of his songs and Find a few sentences or A Phrase, that can stand alone pure poetics as a teaching or even as an affirmation....

"The only love we have is the Love we make"

"Happy is away 2 greet your Burdens"

"Sacred is the Prayer that asks for nothing"

"U can cut off all my fins
But 2 your ways I will not bend
I'll die before I let U tell me how 2 swim"

Nobody knows
Like God knows
Where the deepest part of your river flows

Dearly beloved
We are gathered here today
2 get through this thing called life
Electric word life
It means forever and that's a mighty long time

Love will conquer if you just believe
It's only mountains
And the sea
There's nothing greater, you and me

We can literally GRAB three or four lines from every song and Find examples of Beautiful prose that is vivid in its imagery..

"Stevie wonder once saidPrinces Lyrics are so Vivid even I can see them "

I mean...Some, one day will assemble all these GEMS into a book and in 100 years time, people will be QUOTING Prince in a similar way that they Quote Rumi.

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #48 posted 03/20/17 7:45pm

FlyOnTheWall

Lovejunky said:

purplerabbithole said:

I like many of Prince's lyrics. Don't get me wrong. They are often funny, sexy, romantic, descriptive, colorful, dirty in the best sense, spiritual and introspective. They can also have good narrative structure.

But they also could be off in left field, politically confusing, too religious for their own good, trashy in worst sense and repetitive.

Anyway, we were talking in another thread about some of Prince's half assed notions, paranoid conspiracy theories, and 'ignorant' beliefs which all exemplify the expression "A little learning is a dangerous thing."

PRince had a naturally quick brain, a wit, a prying mind, and even a sensitivity. Imagine what he could have done with this natural ability if he had more formal education, less religious doctrine shoved down his throat by father figures (yes LG and daddy Nelson) and a slighly more humanist rather than spiritual take on his talent.

I don't mind spirituality or a belief that music has spiritual elements to it...but Prince being a vessel for the music of God stuff at times stiffled his creativity. Insulated him. A great lyricist reads novels not conspiracy books. They read the Bible but they also read Shakespeare.

I think his personal issues at times got in the way of his lyricism. I wish someone could have kidnapped him for a year (or better yet convinced him) to sit down and read 100 of the best poems ever written and ten great history books with various POV (not just Afrocentric ones) on one subject he was passionate about.

[Edited 3/18/17 22:27pm]

I get what you are saying..However I Disagree in the sense that Prince was an incredible Lyricist.

his Particular gift was the he was Very Word Economic..

some of the Phrases he left behind are like Written Pictures....

You can take any one of his songs and Find a few sentences or A Phrase, that can stand alone pure poetics as a teaching or even as an affirmation....

Love will conquer if you just believe
It's only mountains
And the sea
There's nothing greater, you and me

We can literally GRAB three or four lines from every song and Find examples of Beautiful prose that is vivid in its imagery..

"Stevie wonder once saidPrinces Lyrics are so Vivid even I can see them "

I mean...Some, one day will assemble all these GEMS into a book and in 100 years time, people will be QUOTING Prince in a similar way that they Quote Rumi.

yeahthat

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Reply #49 posted 03/20/17 8:51pm

Iamtheorg

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purplerabbithole said:

purplerabbithole said:

What two white girls? Wendy and Lisa? Ask OldFriends4Sale what I used to write about the Revolution/Eric Leeds taking too much credit for his work and claiming that they introduced him to the Beatles and real jazz. I was actually pissed about their Reunion for a little while.

Will you chill, please. I am not a racist. My wishing prince had read a larger variety books than the ones shown at Paisley is because I was an English teacher and majored in English Secondary Education and Creative Writing. I might be an intellectual snob but I am not a racist. One more time --I actually like that he read African History. I dislike the conspiracy theorist from Britain (white dude) and that white chick who wrote about her near death experience.

You're one of the Get Out auction types.

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Reply #50 posted 03/20/17 9:53pm

DonRants

Damn! biggrin biggrin I am filing that one away for future use. Thank you in advance Iamtheorg.

Iamtheorg said:

You're one of the Get Out auction types.

Go see "Get Out" if you did not get the reference.

[Edited 3/21/17 5:40am]

To All the Haters on the Internet
No more Candy 4 U
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Reply #51 posted 03/20/17 10:24pm

AnonymousFan

Iamtheorg said:

purplerabbithole said:

You're one of the Get Out auction types.

Lol. Thank you.

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