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Reply #30 posted 08/07/18 11:37am

Zannaloaf

PennyPurple said:

Jellybean has Prince issues. He's bold now, isn't he? ...

He always was, this is nothing new. He has always been straightforward.

[Edited 8/7/18 11:39am]

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Reply #31 posted 08/07/18 11:39am

Zannaloaf

onlyforaminute said:

SkipperLove said:

A middle ground might have been Prince saying "I don't want you to use the name, but I will hire you to open for me with your new name and we can jam together doing the older songs."



It may have been "nice" of Prince if he had of (fill in the blank), but I think we can see he really didn't do much of anything unless it inspired him to do it, or he needed to pay his bills. I don't know if that's something for ME to be mad at him about. His mind wasn't there anymore, ok then. I'm getting that they could do what they wanted just not with his brand, if that's the case then why haven't they been pissed about it for a minute and then get over it and then move on. That's what I'm not understanding. They've been pissed for years now about a name.

Actually htey DID move on and rebranded. A name for a band means BOOKINGS becasue thename has clout- even with teh same members. Thats why bands like Foreigner and Jorney are still touring under those names even without the original singers. If it was another name no one would book them. Same thing wth The Time. Non hardcore Prince fans who knew of the Time would have easily given the Original 7 a shot becasue they liked the Time IF it was under the name the Time.

[Edited 8/7/18 11:42am]

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Reply #32 posted 08/07/18 11:40am

Zannaloaf

endiadj said:

Whatever. These are grown ass people, supposedly with talent of their own. Use your own name and make your own way. Stop going back to Prince did this or that, Prince worked us too hard, or Prince didn't let me use a name that he gave me nonsense. Grow up and move on.

I like that youare in the position to dismiss the livlihoods of talented people as "whatever".

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Reply #33 posted 08/07/18 11:40am

OldFriends4Sal
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I never compared them to Apollonia or Vanity, I'm talking about the ages and such. I did a run through of the ages of a lot of the people he worked with especially during the 2012-2013 period and they were a lot in their 20s.


I'm just saying, when he was talking about protecting these older artists like Joni Chaka and Larry, but ...

SkipperLove said:

Anyone he worked with after 2004 (when he coined that phrase) was a real talent. I would call Prince out a bit on the ageism but I disagree that the women he worked with later belong in the same category as Apollonia, Vanity (charisma--yes, singing talent--no), and Carmen Electra. Tamar Davis can sing. It may have pained Wendy and Lisa that she got so much focus in 2006 but she could sing and I imagined she respected Prince's legacy as well.

OldFriends4Sale said:

The fact is they truelly appreciated Prince and his legacy, which is also why they wanted to do some songs with Prince. Just like the Time, there was more to it than just using the name.

With Prince in those years pushing the 'real music by real musicians' line, it didn't make sense for him to be cosigning all these young women artists but to diss these people who were real musicians and respected Prince's legacy.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
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Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #34 posted 08/07/18 11:42am

OldFriends4Sal
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Graycap23 said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

yeah, different in name, but Sheila E will always be seen as an extension of him as well, and she did her own thing, even if it didn't flow with what Prince was doing.

The Family new music wasn't any kind of detractor from who Prince was at the time.

And the Time still toured and did shows as the Time, even if a lot of what Prince thought and did was not on the same path. It didn't matter.

Lol.......it mattered 2 Prince.

End of story.

I didn't say it didn't matter.
But they were still a part of the foundational years.


People can say what they want, but it is the 1980-1987 yrs that will get the attention going forward

And the story is not ended actually...

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #35 posted 08/07/18 11:45am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

I never compared them to Apollonia or Vanity, I'm talking about the ages and such. I did a run through of the ages of a lot of the people he worked with especially during the 2012-2013 period and they were a lot in their 20s.


I'm just saying, when he was talking about protecting these older artists like Joni Chaka and Larry, but ...

SkipperLove said:

Anyone he worked with after 2004 (when he coined that phrase) was a real talent. I would call Prince out a bit on the ageism but I disagree that the women he worked with later belong in the same category as Apollonia, Vanity (charisma--yes, singing talent--no), and Carmen Electra. Tamar Davis can sing. It may have pained Wendy and Lisa that she got so much focus in 2006 but she could sing and I imagined she respected Prince's legacy as well.


Was he supposed to be "protecting" artist in his own age group? I mean in the arena of competition, which we all can see can be fierce, at what point are they supposed to stand up and challenge him as opposed to having him carry them?

"If you want the wise man to be as angry as the unworthiness of the crimes demands, he must become not angry but insane."
- Seneca, On Anger 2.9.4
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Reply #36 posted 08/07/18 11:47am

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

I never compared them to Apollonia or Vanity, I'm talking about the ages and such. I did a run through of the ages of a lot of the people he worked with especially during the 2012-2013 period and they were a lot in their 20s.


I'm just saying, when he was talking about protecting these older artists like Joni Chaka and Larry, but ...


Was he supposed to be "protecting" artist in his own age group? I mean in the arena of competition, which we all can see can be fierce, at what point are they supposed to stand up and challenge him as opposed to having him carry them?

He was talking about making sure their legacies continue and survive

...

so in the mid 90s you see Prince pulling Chaka Khan and Larry Graham and a few others along with him to put them in the public eye, even thought Prince wasn't really in the public eye like he used to.
But he did keep pushing Larry G

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #37 posted 08/07/18 11:51am

OldFriends4Sal
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When it comes down to it, the formational years of most artists are the periods that stand the test of time... And people that were a part of it will have the heart and passion to keep the spirit of Prince's music alive.
Even at the BET tribute a few just couldn't resist the assless pants.

.
.
Truth is, Prince in the 80s was building a musical empire with a vision and distinct sounds. He did have everyone and everything in his camp from 1980-1987 that could have made Paisley Park grand.

It isn't suprising that it fell flat not long after 89.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #38 posted 08/07/18 11:56am

OldFriends4Sal
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Zannaloaf said:

endiadj said:

Whatever. These are grown ass people, supposedly with talent of their own. Use your own name and make your own way. Stop going back to Prince did this or that, Prince worked us too hard, or Prince didn't let me use a name that he gave me nonsense. Grow up and move on.

I like that youare in the position to dismiss the livlihoods of talented people as "whatever".

Right, because Prince whole career after the 80s was founded on 1978-1988

withought it the passion that became Prince live etc would not be

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #39 posted 08/07/18 12:09pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:


Was he supposed to be "protecting" artist in his own age group? I mean in the arena of competition, which we all can see can be fierce, at what point are they supposed to stand up and challenge him as opposed to having him carry them?

He was talking about making sure their legacies continue and survive

...

so in the mid 90s you see Prince pulling Chaka Khan and Larry Graham and a few others along with him to put them in the public eye, even thought Prince wasn't really in the public eye like he used to.
But he did keep pushing Larry G



I get what your saying. Chaka and Larry had already created their own legacy, and he obviously was showcasing their merits, but going back to him showcasing so much young female talent as opposed to showcasing the talent of those he's already worked with. Isn't there a point that they should become competition for him? He seem to relish the rivalry between him and MJ. You hear reports of how competative he was within his own group when he was younger. He seemed to thrive off it even if he didn't come out the winner, it pushed him to excel. Who carries around their competition?

[Edited 8/7/18 12:10pm]

"If you want the wise man to be as angry as the unworthiness of the crimes demands, he must become not angry but insane."
- Seneca, On Anger 2.9.4
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Reply #40 posted 08/07/18 12:16pm

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

He was talking about making sure their legacies continue and survive

...

so in the mid 90s you see Prince pulling Chaka Khan and Larry Graham and a few others along with him to put them in the public eye, even thought Prince wasn't really in the public eye like he used to.
But he did keep pushing Larry G



I get what your saying. Chaka and Larry had already created their own legacy, and he obviously was showcasing their merits, but going back to him showcasing so much young female talent as opposed to showcasing the talent of those he's already worked with. Isn't there a point that they should become competition for him? He seem to relish the rivalry between him and MJ. You hear reports of how competative he was within his own group when he was younger. He seemed to thrive off it even if he didn't come out the winner, it pushed him to excel. Who carries around their competition?

[Edited 8/7/18 12:10pm]

No, I wouldn't want nor do I think they wanted to be competion. Even back then, it might have been a 'little' fun, but I doubt the Time overall wanted to be treated as competion. Even Prince changed that by 1984 and how he dealt with Sheila E and others. They reflected Prince. And that is how I still see them.
.
Rivalry between Prince & MJ was not real. It might have been in Mikes mind, but I doubt Prince saw it that way. Which is why he tended to avoid it. And later in the late 90s, he said he didn't understand why people compared them, that he was a ax man, he said compare him to other guitarists if anything.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #41 posted 08/07/18 12:29pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



I get what your saying. Chaka and Larry had already created their own legacy, and he obviously was showcasing their merits, but going back to him showcasing so much young female talent as opposed to showcasing the talent of those he's already worked with. Isn't there a point that they should become competition for him? He seem to relish the rivalry between him and MJ. You hear reports of how competative he was within his own group when he was younger. He seemed to thrive off it even if he didn't come out the winner, it pushed him to excel. Who carries around their competition?

[Edited 8/7/18 12:10pm]

No, I wouldn't want nor do I think they wanted to be competion. Even back then, it might have been a 'little' fun, but I doubt the Time overall wanted to be treated as competion. Even Prince changed that by 1984 and how he dealt with Sheila E and others. They reflected Prince. And that is how I still see them.
.
Rivalry between Prince & MJ was not real. It might have been in Mikes mind, but I doubt Prince saw it that way. Which is why he tended to avoid it. And later in the late 90s, he said he didn't understand why people compared them, that he was a ax man, he said compare him to other guitarists if anything.



I guess we disagree on that. I do believe there was a little rivalry, too many little incidents between them that usually Prince tried to one up him on. So many of those that worked with him, the men, always seem to throw in how jealous he was of them on their superior ability. Maybe that's true. But I also think he got a kick of running a race as an equal as oppose to feeling he had to carry and pump up egos, which you can see he did a lot.

"If you want the wise man to be as angry as the unworthiness of the crimes demands, he must become not angry but insane."
- Seneca, On Anger 2.9.4
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Reply #42 posted 08/07/18 1:00pm

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

No, I wouldn't want nor do I think they wanted to be competion. Even back then, it might have been a 'little' fun, but I doubt the Time overall wanted to be treated as competion. Even Prince changed that by 1984 and how he dealt with Sheila E and others. They reflected Prince. And that is how I still see them.
.
Rivalry between Prince & MJ was not real. It might have been in Mikes mind, but I doubt Prince saw it that way. Which is why he tended to avoid it. And later in the late 90s, he said he didn't understand why people compared them, that he was a ax man, he said compare him to other guitarists if anything.



I guess we disagree on that. I do believe there was a little rivalry, too many little incidents between them that usually Prince tried to one up him on. So many of those that worked with him, the men, always seem to throw in how jealous he was of them on their superior ability. Maybe that's true. But I also think he got a kick of running a race as an equal as oppose to feeling he had to carry and pump up egos, which you can see he did a lot.

Yeah, Prince created the tension. But I don't think the Time wanted it. I mean it was technically not an equal playing field. Yeah they 'competed' in a sense in trying to outdo the other in shows. But Prince was making the albums with Morris sometimes Jesse sometimes his band members, how could it be real competion?
.
I didn't care too much how he clowned Morris at times, Morris didn't seem to like it much.
Even after the Time broke up, Prince kept at it, like during the Love Bizaree video and the Oak Tree, or Shockadelica, or saying Jimmy & Terry were not doing the Minneapolis Sound and just trying to get hits etc

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #43 posted 08/07/18 1:14pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



I guess we disagree on that. I do believe there was a little rivalry, too many little incidents between them that usually Prince tried to one up him on. So many of those that worked with him, the men, always seem to throw in how jealous he was of them on their superior ability. Maybe that's true. But I also think he got a kick of running a race as an equal as oppose to feeling he had to carry and pump up egos, which you can see he did a lot.

Yeah, Prince created the tension. But I don't think the Time wanted it. I mean it was technically not an equal playing field. Yeah they 'competed' in a sense in trying to outdo the other in shows. But Prince was making the albums with Morris sometimes Jesse sometimes his band members, how could it be real competion?
.
I didn't care too much how he clowned Morris at times, Morris didn't seem to like it much.
Even after the Time broke up, Prince kept at it, like during the Love Bizaree video and the Oak Tree, or Shockadelica, or saying Jimmy & Terry were not doing the Minneapolis Sound and just trying to get hits etc



Well, not a real competition in star power, but maybe in ability and showmanship that kind of stuff. I know The Time is a pretty good recognizable group in their own right, there are people who will follow them but could give a hoot about Prince. So it's not a completely Prince fan fanbase they have. I don't know about the others.

"If you want the wise man to be as angry as the unworthiness of the crimes demands, he must become not angry but insane."
- Seneca, On Anger 2.9.4
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Reply #44 posted 08/07/18 2:22pm

PennyPurple

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OldFriends4Sale said:

PennyPurple said:

Jellybean has Prince issues. He's bold now, isn't he? ...

no, Jellybean is country and raw. And he isn't saying anything he wasn't saying before Prince died.

I don't know why people think some of these people waited until Prince died to speak lol

Most were honest in their way long before he died.

2013

http://beldonsbluespoint....hnson.html

BBP: Well I’m curious as to—I was going over some things, man—and I found some videos of you with Ronnie Baker Brooks on the Legendary Rhythm and Blues Cruise. Are you going to do that this year?

Johnson: No, I haven’t been able to do it the last couple of years, man, and I miss it too, you know. Ronnie is in the process of doing his album with Keb’ Mo’ and stuff, and I’ve been dealing with my transgressions around here. The Original 7ven has not really been doing anything but I’m still in another version of the Time; I’m still in another version of the Family, fDeluxe, and at the same time bankruptcy and foreclosure and other personal problems. So it’s been kind of tough for me around here, man, so I’ve got to get back on my mojo around here. But it’s kind of hard.

BBP: Uh. Yeah! Man! I’m surprised to hear about the bankruptcy because you’re such a talented cat and you have so much going on. How’d that happen?

Johnson: Well you know, here’s the thing: that’s the myth everyone thinks. I’m so well-to-do because I grew up around them and have been in bands with rich guys,” but it didn’t translate it out to me because there’s been a lot of selfish bullshit that went on in my career over the years. So that’s where we’re at today. I hate my rich friends: I’m not going to lie, they get on my damn nerves. But at the same time, I’m attached to them for the rest of my life. It’s like HIV: they’re going to always be attached to me, so I just accept it and move on. It’s kind of a bitter pill sometimes that I’m struggling like this and I probably shouldn’t be. But I am, so I have to get through it the best I can.

BBP: Wow! Well who particularly are you mad at? I guess I have to ask that question.

Johnson: Well, a prime example, Prince has messed up three bands I’ve been in. He wouldn’t let us be The Time. You know I’ve been in Morris Day and the Time and I’m in the Original 7ven. We put off our major release last year because he was threatening to sue us. He didn’t want us to be the Time because he’s been a selfish jerk, because he didn’t want a partner. We offered him money, we offered him everything to be part of the project and he didn’t want to be. The same thing with fDeluxe. He did the same thing with us. We got ready to put a record out, we asked him, “Man, you have any songs for us?” No, he didn’t want to have nothing to do with us. He wanted to leave it totally—he created us, and he wanted it to just stay like it is. Well, uh, I’m 56 years old; the rest of us have careers. The rest of us are talented. So we want to make albums, whether he was part of it or not! And he always thought that these bands couldn’t make albums without him.

BBP: Wow. It’s interesting that you bring him up, because I heard today he has a new single out. Something called “Screwdriver?”

Johnson: Yeah, “Screwdriver.” He has a big-assed orchestra now; he’s got bands with guys, he’s got all-girl bands. He was just here; he just played a few days here. But that’s how he is. Prince has not treated our version of the band with any respect since ’06, since he did the Super Bowl. He’s had a hair up his ass about these other bands who have been around him for over 30 years, I might add. And I just don’t understand why. On the other hand, my other people—I was in the Original 7ven with Terry and Jimmy and Jessie Johnson—and they always do this. Anytime a crisis comes, they run off, because they’re rich. They run off, and you don’t hear from them no more. And Jessie Johnson bailed on another project too. So you know I’m just tired of babysitting and bowing down to cats that I grew up with. Because I got talent too. So..

BBP: Yeah, Yeah, I’ve heard it. Yeah, because you guys have been friends since way back. You went to high school together, right?

Johnson: Oh yeah, we grew up together. I grew up with Prince. I’ve been knowing Prince since I was 12 years old. I’m 56 years old now; he’s 54. I’ve been around him since I was 12 damn years old.

BBP: Yeah, and Morris too? Because I remember hearing that you guys used to set up drums in his mother’s house.

Johnson: To play together, yeah. That’s the reason me and Morris are still friends to this day. This is why we’re still friends and we still get to play in a band together because Morris gets this. And even though Morris has his greedy moments and shit too, I understand that. But you know, at the same time, he takes care of me, he makes sure I have some money in my pocket. My other friends that are rich, they didn’t ever do that shit. Except for the years that I worked for Flyte Tyme. And the minute I stopped working for Flyte Time, then that was done. So you know, whatever. But me, I’m just an old rock ‘n’ roller, man…actually I like the blues so much because you can play the blues until you’re 80 damn years old. And so that’s why I’ve always been attached to it. I know this funk/R&B thing that I’m famous for—sooner or later—it’s going to let me down. So I gotta have something to fall back on, because music is all I know. It ain’t like I can go get a job at Wal-Mart, or you know any shit like that, McDonald’s, or any of that bullshit. Who wants a damn-near 60-year-old man doing that? It’s gotta be music for me. That’s what I deal with.

BBP: You played drums first, right?

Johnson: Yeah. I got famous playing the drums first and the guitar was more incognito, because I started doing solos on Jimmy and Terry’s projects, like Alexander O’Neal. I did (O’Neal’s) “Innocent,” I did (The Time’s) “Fishnet,” I did Nona Hendryx “Why Should I Cry?” I did stuff for Janet (Jackson), I did stuff on New Edition, I did Mint Condition; you know, so that’s when my guitar playing came out. But still it was in the background as I was producing, but I was playing on the records. But the drumming—even to this day—here in town a lot of bands want me to play the drums. I just don’t do it. I sit in on guitar. Because my drumming I save for The Time. That’s the style of drumming that I want to play.

BBP: I heard you described guitar as an “emotional instrument.” I was curious about that term. What did you mean by that?

Johnson: Well, this is what I mean: the guitar I look at as spiritual and emotional because I feel it in my soul when I play. …Sometimes, as you know, being in a band with Jesse Johnson, being around great guitar players, and I’m playing the drums, it hits me emotionally. I’m not going to lie about that, but still that’s coming back to me being a guitarist. So, that’s what I meant by that.

BBP: And I notice you kind of like the blues guys. You like Albert King and B.B. and Hendrix was—

Johnson: Oh yeah. Yeah. Albert Collins. B.B. King. All the guys, man. And you know Hendrix, and you know I like some of the hot-shot white guys too. I always liked Frank Marino (Mahogany Rush), Robin Trower, Jeff Beck…I like all of the hot-shot guitar players…and I’ve been lucky enough to either see them or see them live or actually play with some of them. So..I like all the young guys, you know, like Eric Gales. I think Eric Gales is our 21st Century Hendrix. I think he is absolutely scary.

BBP: Yeah, I’ve seen him. Experience Hendrix tour. Did you ever pick up anything from Prince? He’s been known for his guitar playing.

Johnson: You know, I did. I can’t lie and say I didn’t pick up stuff from him. I learned how to be funky because of Prince. You know a lot of my funk came from being around him, because he’s such a funky cat. But at the same time it’s hard, because he’s not an easy guy to be close to. So it’s like he’s begrudgingly letting you learn shit from him, but he really don’t want you to learn it. But you can’t help but learn something from him if you’re around him enough, and that’s the thing. So I retained what I got from him. I just keep it in my back pocket, and like I said I’m always going to be, I’m always called a Prince disciple. Well, I accept that label even though sometimes I resent it. I accept it because I grew up (and) he made me famous. He made the people realize who Jellybean Johnson was. So I will give him that. But at the same time, I want respect from him. Because I helped make him a ton of money too, just like the rest of us.

BBP: Right. Now I heard you guys started in some school called “The Way Opportunities in Music School” in Minneapolis?

Johnson: It wasn’t a music school. It was like a community center where we hung out and stuff. And we didn’t hang out as much. Prince did, but Flyte Tyme was a whole separate thing from the guys at The Way. Prince was up there with Sonny Thompson; they had The Family, their band was called The Family back then and stuff..

BBP: He was a bass player, Sonny Thompson…

Johnson: Yeah. Sonny T. Sonny T: bass player. He’s legendary around here. He’s a badass, and Prince learned a lot from him. And The Way used to give these outdoor festivals every year, and all of our rival bands…we would fight against each other in front of thousands of people. And that’s how we got famous around here in the city, because we used to go at it at a young age. We had a community center here called Phyllis Wheatley. There’s a park: in the middle of July we’d go out there—thousands of people—and all day we’d have battles of the bands. Prince learned a lot of shit from all of us being around. We all learned from each other in this Minneapolis thing when we were younger, around the 70’s, in the middle 70’s coming up.

BBP: You know what strikes me as remarkable about that? It was basically live bands doing shows there—were doing the party scene in Minneapolis—at a time when the rest of the country was going more towards deejays…

Johnson: Yeah. They didn’t even know about us! They didn’t really know about us. That’s the reason Minneapolis music—Prince—made such a big splash in ’78 when he came out. Because they’re like: “Not Minnesota! Cold-assed Minnesota? They’ve got people that funky up there in Minneapolis?” You have to realize too, man, I moved here from Chicago. My mom moved me here from Chicago in 1968 to keep me out of the gangs because the gangs were recruiting me. I was 12 or 13 years old. When I moved here, man, the black radio stations stayed on ‘til about five o’clock in the afternoon. That’s it! That’s all! So I grew up listening to all the white rock bands, man. Black Sabbath. Rare Earth. Three Dog Night. All that shit. All the white rock shit, I grew up listening to that, in addition to having the funk shit because I’m from Chicago! I had already been around Chicago soul—Tyrone Davis; Chicago Blues—Buddy Guy; I had already been around that shit. My mom had records of that, and God bless her, I knew about James Brown, Funkadelic, all that shit, I knew about it. At the same time, I absorbed all of the white rock, and that’s why Prince is different today because of that. Because he was around here—we didn’t have no black radio—we still don’t have a major black radio station here in Minnesota, which is tragic. We don’t.

BBP: Wow. So that’s why the Minneapolis sound you guys played had elements of rock in it.

Johnson: It had a lot of elements of rock because we grew up around that kind of shit. We grew up around the white rock guitars and, you know, Rolling Stones and Kiss and all that. I remember going to see Kiss in 1976. I was the only black kid there watching them there, man. I remember bottles and shit crashing around me. Everything. Because I was standing there, watching them. This is 1976, and I’m watching Kiss and Rush at the fucking Met Center, you know. And like I say I’m probably the only black kid there.

BBP: Wow, that’s incredible. That’s right, because I notice in your drums, the guys you like on drums. I heard that you like the drummer from that Bay Area band, not Tower of Power, but the other one: Lydia Pense is the singer?

Johnson: Oh yeah, Sandy McKee. Sandy McKee was motherfuckin’ scary! Him and David Garibaldi were absolutely scary when I was coming up. And me and Morris learned a lot of shit from most of them.

BBP: David Garibaldi of Tower of Power, you mean.

Johnson: David Garibaldi of Tower Power. And I went from that and I started getting into the fusion drummers, like Lenny White and Billy Cobham, Tony Williams and stuff like that. But I started with David Garibaldi and Sandy McKee. They had that “pop;” I just like it. If you listen to any of the Minneapolis drumming, that’s what we got. We got that “pop” on our shit, man, because of that. To this day.

BBP: Wow. What was that band called?

Johnson: Which one?

BBP: Sandy McKee’s band.

Johnson: Oh. Cold Blood!

BBP: Yes!

Johnson: Lydia Pense was the lead singer and they had horns, and some of those horn players used to play in Tower of Power. That’s East Bay, that’s Oakland, man. That’s Oakland funk, man. That’s what it is: Oakland/San Francisco, that’s where we got that shit from, man!

BBP: “Squib Cakes…”

Johnson: “Squib Cakes” and all that shit, man! Yeah, Morris could play “Squib Cakes” beat-for-beat, man. That intro that David Garibaldi played, Morris is the closest cat on this earth to sounding like David Garibaldi. I tell people that, they freak the fuck out. I’m telling you, if you heard Morris Day, cool-ass Morris Day play the drums, he sounds like David Garibaldi when he plays drums.

BBP: I heard that he started out as a drummer but he never does it with The Time, or I’ve never seen him.

Johnson: No he never plays with The Time. We were going to do it. We played back in ’08: we did a three week stand at the Flamingo in Vegas, and we were going to do that. Morris was going to play the drums, I was going to play the guitar, and Jesse Johnson had a hissy fit, and we couldn’t do it.

BBP: Oh, wow. Wow! What’s your relationship with him (Jesse Johnson) like? I heard he had an interesting background. He used to play in biker bars and stuff like that

Johnson: He’s from East St. Louis and Springfield, Illinois and all that shit. But Jesse is crazy, man. I love him to death, but Jesse is nuts, so, we have a skewed relationship. We have the same last name, people think we’re brothers. We’re brothers in one way, but we don’t get along. We’re like estranged brothers—trust me—because he’s hard to deal with. He’s very hard to deal with, and he’s a selfish person. That’s his biggest problem. His biggest problem is he wants to be Prince and he’s not Prince. He can’t be Prince. So that’s the whole thing.

BBP: So what’s this I hear about him getting handcuffed to a—what was it—a coat rack?

Johnson: That’s back in our early days of The Time and shit. We got into a food fight with Prince’s band…that was our first year out. That was us, them and Zapp. And the last couple of nights of the tour we got into it with him and his band, Prince and his band, and they started doing shit to us while we were on stage. And one night they just took Jesse off stage—and Jerome—and took Jesse back in their dressing room while we were in concert. Prince had his bodyguard take Jesse off the stage, take him back in the dressing room, handcuff him to the thing. He (Prince) played guitar, Prince jumped in The Time and played guitar while this is going down. Back then his band put food and shit all over Jesse and Jerome.

BBP: Wow…

Johnson: This is the kind of childish shit that Prince did. So, after we got done, we went back and rescued Jesse, and we went and got us some shit, put us some dirty clothes on and found every egg, and everything we could and waited for them after the concert. And we beat their asses! Of course it cost Morris a bunch of money because Prince charged Morris a bunch of money for wrecking the arena. But we beat their ass! You know, because it’s ridiculous! You have to realize, we’re some kids from the street. The original Time was just some ghetto kids from the street, and there’s some shit you just ain’t going to put up with. And that includes Jimmy and Terry—all of us. Even Monte, the little white boy; some shit, we just will not put up with. Because we’re like a gang. And Prince’s band, they couldn’t compare to us with that. And he knew it. And deep down, Prince wants to be one of us. He had created this Frankenstein and he couldn’t control it no more. So he actually wanted to be one of us and he couldn’t, ‘cause he was Prince.

BBP: He wasn’t part of your group, he wasn’t part of your circle while you were growing up? Was he different?

Johnson: No. He made music and he told us what to play and we came in and played, a lot of times better than what he had. And in concert it went over better than what it did on record, and after a while he resented that shit. He resented it! And so then, when it came time for us to do a record on our own, he didn’t want us to do it. ‘Cause he didn’t want it to be better than something he had come up with.

Wow. Why does he think Prince owed him anything? He's even hatin on Jesse Johnson. lol

And the stuff he said about Morris...Ok, but again why does he think everyone has to take care of him?

And even though Morris has his greedy moments and shit too, I understand that. But you know, at the same time, he takes care of me, he makes sure I have some money in my pocket. My other friends that are rich, they didn’t ever do that shit. Except for the years that I worked for Flyte Tyme. And the minute I stopped working for Flyte Time, then that was done.

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Reply #45 posted 08/07/18 4:23pm

OldFriends4Sal
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PennyPurple said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

no, Jellybean is country and raw. And he isn't saying anything he wasn't saying before Prince died.

I don't know why people think some of these people waited until Prince died to speak lol

Most were honest in their way long before he died.

2013

http://beldonsbluespoint....hnson.html

BBP: Well I’m curious as to—I was going over some things, man—and I found some videos of you with Ronnie Baker Brooks on the Legendary Rhythm and Blues Cruise. Are you going to do that this year?

Johnson: No, I haven’t been able to do it the last couple of years, man, and I miss it too, you know. Ronnie is in the process of doing his album with Keb’ Mo’ and stuff, and I’ve been dealing with my transgressions around here. The Original 7ven has not really been doing anything but I’m still in another version of the Time; I’m still in another version of the Family, fDeluxe, and at the same time bankruptcy and foreclosure and other personal problems. So it’s been kind of tough for me around here, man, so I’ve got to get back on my mojo around here. But it’s kind of hard.

BBP: Uh. Yeah! Man! I’m surprised to hear about the bankruptcy because you’re such a talented cat and you have so much going on. How’d that happen?

Johnson: Well you know, here’s the thing: that’s the myth everyone thinks. I’m so well-to-do because I grew up around them and have been in bands with rich guys,” but it didn’t translate it out to me because there’s been a lot of selfish bullshit that went on in my career over the years. So that’s where we’re at today. I hate my rich friends: I’m not going to lie, they get on my damn nerves. But at the same time, I’m attached to them for the rest of my life. It’s like HIV: they’re going to always be attached to me, so I just accept it and move on. It’s kind of a bitter pill sometimes that I’m struggling like this and I probably shouldn’t be. But I am, so I have to get through it the best I can.

BBP: Wow! Well who particularly are you mad at? I guess I have to ask that question.

Johnson: Well, a prime example, Prince has messed up three bands I’ve been in. He wouldn’t let us be The Time. You know I’ve been in Morris Day and the Time and I’m in the Original 7ven. We put off our major release last year because he was threatening to sue us. He didn’t want us to be the Time because he’s been a selfish jerk, because he didn’t want a partner. We offered him money, we offered him everything to be part of the project and he didn’t want to be. The same thing with fDeluxe. He did the same thing with us. We got ready to put a record out, we asked him, “Man, you have any songs for us?” No, he didn’t want to have nothing to do with us. He wanted to leave it totally—he created us, and he wanted it to just stay like it is. Well, uh, I’m 56 years old; the rest of us have careers. The rest of us are talented. So we want to make albums, whether he was part of it or not! And he always thought that these bands couldn’t make albums without him.

BBP: Wow. It’s interesting that you bring him up, because I heard today he has a new single out. Something called “Screwdriver?”

Johnson: Yeah, “Screwdriver.” He has a big-assed orchestra now; he’s got bands with guys, he’s got all-girl bands. He was just here; he just played a few days here. But that’s how he is. Prince has not treated our version of the band with any respect since ’06, since he did the Super Bowl. He’s had a hair up his ass about these other bands who have been around him for over 30 years, I might add. And I just don’t understand why. On the other hand, my other people—I was in the Original 7ven with Terry and Jimmy and Jessie Johnson—and they always do this. Anytime a crisis comes, they run off, because they’re rich. They run off, and you don’t hear from them no more. And Jessie Johnson bailed on another project too. So you know I’m just tired of babysitting and bowing down to cats that I grew up with. Because I got talent too. So..

BBP: Yeah, Yeah, I’ve heard it. Yeah, because you guys have been friends since way back. You went to high school together, right?

Johnson: Oh yeah, we grew up together. I grew up with Prince. I’ve been knowing Prince since I was 12 years old. I’m 56 years old now; he’s 54. I’ve been around him since I was 12 damn years old.

BBP: Yeah, and Morris too? Because I remember hearing that you guys used to set up drums in his mother’s house.

Johnson: To play together, yeah. That’s the reason me and Morris are still friends to this day. This is why we’re still friends and we still get to play in a band together because Morris gets this. And even though Morris has his greedy moments and shit too, I understand that. But you know, at the same time, he takes care of me, he makes sure I have some money in my pocket. My other friends that are rich, they didn’t ever do that shit. Except for the years that I worked for Flyte Tyme. And the minute I stopped working for Flyte Time, then that was done. So you know, whatever. But me, I’m just an old rock ‘n’ roller, man…actually I like the blues so much because you can play the blues until you’re 80 damn years old. And so that’s why I’ve always been attached to it. I know this funk/R&B thing that I’m famous for—sooner or later—it’s going to let me down. So I gotta have something to fall back on, because music is all I know. It ain’t like I can go get a job at Wal-Mart, or you know any shit like that, McDonald’s, or any of that bullshit. Who wants a damn-near 60-year-old man doing that? It’s gotta be music for me. That’s what I deal with.

BBP: You played drums first, right?

Johnson: Yeah. I got famous playing the drums first and the guitar was more incognito, because I started doing solos on Jimmy and Terry’s projects, like Alexander O’Neal. I did (O’Neal’s) “Innocent,” I did (The Time’s) “Fishnet,” I did Nona Hendryx “Why Should I Cry?” I did stuff for Janet (Jackson), I did stuff on New Edition, I did Mint Condition; you know, so that’s when my guitar playing came out. But still it was in the background as I was producing, but I was playing on the records. But the drumming—even to this day—here in town a lot of bands want me to play the drums. I just don’t do it. I sit in on guitar. Because my drumming I save for The Time. That’s the style of drumming that I want to play.

BBP: I heard you described guitar as an “emotional instrument.” I was curious about that term. What did you mean by that?

Johnson: Well, this is what I mean: the guitar I look at as spiritual and emotional because I feel it in my soul when I play. …Sometimes, as you know, being in a band with Jesse Johnson, being around great guitar players, and I’m playing the drums, it hits me emotionally. I’m not going to lie about that, but still that’s coming back to me being a guitarist. So, that’s what I meant by that.

BBP: And I notice you kind of like the blues guys. You like Albert King and B.B. and Hendrix was—

Johnson: Oh yeah. Yeah. Albert Collins. B.B. King. All the guys, man. And you know Hendrix, and you know I like some of the hot-shot white guys too. I always liked Frank Marino (Mahogany Rush), Robin Trower, Jeff Beck…I like all of the hot-shot guitar players…and I’ve been lucky enough to either see them or see them live or actually play with some of them. So..I like all the young guys, you know, like Eric Gales. I think Eric Gales is our 21st Century Hendrix. I think he is absolutely scary.

BBP: Yeah, I’ve seen him. Experience Hendrix tour. Did you ever pick up anything from Prince? He’s been known for his guitar playing.

Johnson: You know, I did. I can’t lie and say I didn’t pick up stuff from him. I learned how to be funky because of Prince. You know a lot of my funk came from being around him, because he’s such a funky cat. But at the same time it’s hard, because he’s not an easy guy to be close to. So it’s like he’s begrudgingly letting you learn shit from him, but he really don’t want you to learn it. But you can’t help but learn something from him if you’re around him enough, and that’s the thing. So I retained what I got from him. I just keep it in my back pocket, and like I said I’m always going to be, I’m always called a Prince disciple. Well, I accept that label even though sometimes I resent it. I accept it because I grew up (and) he made me famous. He made the people realize who Jellybean Johnson was. So I will give him that. But at the same time, I want respect from him. Because I helped make him a ton of money too, just like the rest of us.

BBP: Right. Now I heard you guys started in some school called “The Way Opportunities in Music School” in Minneapolis?

Johnson: It wasn’t a music school. It was like a community center where we hung out and stuff. And we didn’t hang out as much. Prince did, but Flyte Tyme was a whole separate thing from the guys at The Way. Prince was up there with Sonny Thompson; they had The Family, their band was called The Family back then and stuff..

BBP: He was a bass player, Sonny Thompson…

Johnson: Yeah. Sonny T. Sonny T: bass player. He’s legendary around here. He’s a badass, and Prince learned a lot from him. And The Way used to give these outdoor festivals every year, and all of our rival bands…we would fight against each other in front of thousands of people. And that’s how we got famous around here in the city, because we used to go at it at a young age. We had a community center here called Phyllis Wheatley. There’s a park: in the middle of July we’d go out there—thousands of people—and all day we’d have battles of the bands. Prince learned a lot of shit from all of us being around. We all learned from each other in this Minneapolis thing when we were younger, around the 70’s, in the middle 70’s coming up.

BBP: You know what strikes me as remarkable about that? It was basically live bands doing shows there—were doing the party scene in Minneapolis—at a time when the rest of the country was going more towards deejays…

Johnson: Yeah. They didn’t even know about us! They didn’t really know about us. That’s the reason Minneapolis music—Prince—made such a big splash in ’78 when he came out. Because they’re like: “Not Minnesota! Cold-assed Minnesota? They’ve got people that funky up there in Minneapolis?” You have to realize too, man, I moved here from Chicago. My mom moved me here from Chicago in 1968 to keep me out of the gangs because the gangs were recruiting me. I was 12 or 13 years old. When I moved here, man, the black radio stations stayed on ‘til about five o’clock in the afternoon. That’s it! That’s all! So I grew up listening to all the white rock bands, man. Black Sabbath. Rare Earth. Three Dog Night. All that shit. All the white rock shit, I grew up listening to that, in addition to having the funk shit because I’m from Chicago! I had already been around Chicago soul—Tyrone Davis; Chicago Blues—Buddy Guy; I had already been around that shit. My mom had records of that, and God bless her, I knew about James Brown, Funkadelic, all that shit, I knew about it. At the same time, I absorbed all of the white rock, and that’s why Prince is different today because of that. Because he was around here—we didn’t have no black radio—we still don’t have a major black radio station here in Minnesota, which is tragic. We don’t.

BBP: Wow. So that’s why the Minneapolis sound you guys played had elements of rock in it.

Johnson: It had a lot of elements of rock because we grew up around that kind of shit. We grew up around the white rock guitars and, you know, Rolling Stones and Kiss and all that. I remember going to see Kiss in 1976. I was the only black kid there watching them there, man. I remember bottles and shit crashing around me. Everything. Because I was standing there, watching them. This is 1976, and I’m watching Kiss and Rush at the fucking Met Center, you know. And like I say I’m probably the only black kid there.

BBP: Wow, that’s incredible. That’s right, because I notice in your drums, the guys you like on drums. I heard that you like the drummer from that Bay Area band, not Tower of Power, but the other one: Lydia Pense is the singer?

Johnson: Oh yeah, Sandy McKee. Sandy McKee was motherfuckin’ scary! Him and David Garibaldi were absolutely scary when I was coming up. And me and Morris learned a lot of shit from most of them.

BBP: David Garibaldi of Tower of Power, you mean.

Johnson: David Garibaldi of Tower Power. And I went from that and I started getting into the fusion drummers, like Lenny White and Billy Cobham, Tony Williams and stuff like that. But I started with David Garibaldi and Sandy McKee. They had that “pop;” I just like it. If you listen to any of the Minneapolis drumming, that’s what we got. We got that “pop” on our shit, man, because of that. To this day.

BBP: Wow. What was that band called?

Johnson: Which one?

BBP: Sandy McKee’s band.

Johnson: Oh. Cold Blood!

BBP: Yes!

Johnson: Lydia Pense was the lead singer and they had horns, and some of those horn players used to play in Tower of Power. That’s East Bay, that’s Oakland, man. That’s Oakland funk, man. That’s what it is: Oakland/San Francisco, that’s where we got that shit from, man!

BBP: “Squib Cakes…”

Johnson: “Squib Cakes” and all that shit, man! Yeah, Morris could play “Squib Cakes” beat-for-beat, man. That intro that David Garibaldi played, Morris is the closest cat on this earth to sounding like David Garibaldi. I tell people that, they freak the fuck out. I’m telling you, if you heard Morris Day, cool-ass Morris Day play the drums, he sounds like David Garibaldi when he plays drums.

BBP: I heard that he started out as a drummer but he never does it with The Time, or I’ve never seen him.

Johnson: No he never plays with The Time. We were going to do it. We played back in ’08: we did a three week stand at the Flamingo in Vegas, and we were going to do that. Morris was going to play the drums, I was going to play the guitar, and Jesse Johnson had a hissy fit, and we couldn’t do it.

BBP: Oh, wow. Wow! What’s your relationship with him (Jesse Johnson) like? I heard he had an interesting background. He used to play in biker bars and stuff like that

Johnson: He’s from East St. Louis and Springfield, Illinois and all that shit. But Jesse is crazy, man. I love him to death, but Jesse is nuts, so, we have a skewed relationship. We have the same last name, people think we’re brothers. We’re brothers in one way, but we don’t get along. We’re like estranged brothers—trust me—because he’s hard to deal with. He’s very hard to deal with, and he’s a selfish person. That’s his biggest problem. His biggest problem is he wants to be Prince and he’s not Prince. He can’t be Prince. So that’s the whole thing.

BBP: So what’s this I hear about him getting handcuffed to a—what was it—a coat rack?

Johnson: That’s back in our early days of The Time and shit. We got into a food fight with Prince’s band…that was our first year out. That was us, them and Zapp. And the last couple of nights of the tour we got into it with him and his band, Prince and his band, and they started doing shit to us while we were on stage. And one night they just took Jesse off stage—and Jerome—and took Jesse back in their dressing room while we were in concert. Prince had his bodyguard take Jesse off the stage, take him back in the dressing room, handcuff him to the thing. He (Prince) played guitar, Prince jumped in The Time and played guitar while this is going down. Back then his band put food and shit all over Jesse and Jerome.

BBP: Wow…

Johnson: This is the kind of childish shit that Prince did. So, after we got done, we went back and rescued Jesse, and we went and got us some shit, put us some dirty clothes on and found every egg, and everything we could and waited for them after the concert. And we beat their asses! Of course it cost Morris a bunch of money because Prince charged Morris a bunch of money for wrecking the arena. But we beat their ass! You know, because it’s ridiculous! You have to realize, we’re some kids from the street. The original Time was just some ghetto kids from the street, and there’s some shit you just ain’t going to put up with. And that includes Jimmy and Terry—all of us. Even Monte, the little white boy; some shit, we just will not put up with. Because we’re like a gang. And Prince’s band, they couldn’t compare to us with that. And he knew it. And deep down, Prince wants to be one of us. He had created this Frankenstein and he couldn’t control it no more. So he actually wanted to be one of us and he couldn’t, ‘cause he was Prince.

BBP: He wasn’t part of your group, he wasn’t part of your circle while you were growing up? Was he different?

Johnson: No. He made music and he told us what to play and we came in and played, a lot of times better than what he had. And in concert it went over better than what it did on record, and after a while he resented that shit. He resented it! And so then, when it came time for us to do a record on our own, he didn’t want us to do it. ‘Cause he didn’t want it to be better than something he had come up with.

Wow. Why does he think Prince owed him anything? He's even hatin on Jesse Johnson. lol

And the stuff he said about Morris...Ok, but again why does he think everyone has to take care of him?

And even though Morris has his greedy moments and shit too, I understand that. But you know, at the same time, he takes care of me, he makes sure I have some money in my pocket. My other friends that are rich, they didn’t ever do that shit. Except for the years that I worked for Flyte Tyme. And the minute I stopped working for Flyte Time, then that was done.

Naw he loves Jesse, but Jesse was being wishy washy, did you read Jesse's response to why he pulled out of the Time Condensate promoting?

lol He knows Morris better than us and they still perform together and love each other.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #46 posted 08/07/18 4:26pm

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Yeah, Prince created the tension. But I don't think the Time wanted it. I mean it was technically not an equal playing field. Yeah they 'competed' in a sense in trying to outdo the other in shows. But Prince was making the albums with Morris sometimes Jesse sometimes his band members, how could it be real competion?
.
I didn't care too much how he clowned Morris at times, Morris didn't seem to like it much.
Even after the Time broke up, Prince kept at it, like during the Love Bizaree video and the Oak Tree, or Shockadelica, or saying Jimmy & Terry were not doing the Minneapolis Sound and just trying to get hits etc



Well, not a real competition in star power, but maybe in ability and showmanship that kind of stuff. I know The Time is a pretty good recognizable group in their own right, there are people who will follow them but could give a hoot about Prince. So it's not a completely Prince fan fanbase they have. I don't know about the others.

Yeah, but the Time is forever a part of Uptown, same with Sheila E, yeah we may love her other stuff, but it is the when she started doing more songs from her Prince albums that the shows really got live and she had Eddie M with her, again someone from the foundational years.

Sheila E's music hasn't been that good, Morris Day, Jesse Johnson, the Time, the Family has put out some really good stand alone music.

The Family's albums really showed respect to their origins, it feels like the Family-1985, 20+ years later. I really wish Prince would have done a song or two with them.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #47 posted 08/07/18 6:55pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



Well, not a real competition in star power, but maybe in ability and showmanship that kind of stuff. I know The Time is a pretty good recognizable group in their own right, there are people who will follow them but could give a hoot about Prince. So it's not a completely Prince fan fanbase they have. I don't know about the others.

Yeah, but the Time is forever a part of Uptown, same with Sheila E, yeah we may love her other stuff, but it is the when she started doing more songs from her Prince albums that the shows really got live and she had Eddie M with her, again someone from the foundational years.

Sheila E's music hasn't been that good, Morris Day, Jesse Johnson, the Time, the Family has put out some really good stand alone music.

The Family's albums really showed respect to their origins, it feels like the Family-1985, 20+ years later. I really wish Prince would have done a song or two with them.



Yeah, Prince fans recognize the sound but they still appeal to other people who don't know anything much about Prince, except maybe he was an 80s popstar. I'm just going by those handful of people I know of who say those kind of things. I'm sure there's more because the Time concerts I've been to were pretty full, of course I didn't do a survey to find out who's a Prince fan. I've never seen The Family perform and even if they wouldn't appeal to me if they have another small fanbase outside of Prince fans then cool. It would have been nice to see him do that but he didn't want to so what can you do?

"If you want the wise man to be as angry as the unworthiness of the crimes demands, he must become not angry but insane."
- Seneca, On Anger 2.9.4
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Reply #48 posted 08/20/18 3:18pm

PennyPurple

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Surprised to see that Jellybean was up in Prince's house after the disrespectful things he's said about Prince.

Why would he want to come to Prince's house, and why would Paisley Park want him there?

I just think it's so disrespectful of both parties. sad




"What if half the things ever said turned out to be a lie? How will you know the truth?" - #Prince

There was no mistaking "The Truth" at #PaisleyParkAfterDark on Saturday night! Musicians Jellybean Johnson, Homer O'Dell, Chance Howard, Donnie Lamarca, Kathleen Johnson, Kirk Johnson, Art Haynes, and GSharp and The Bizness had the NPG Music Club testifying to the truth all night long!

Join us at our next PPAD event on September 8th - tickets available at officialpaisleypark.com!

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Reply #49 posted 08/20/18 3:29pm

onlyforaminute

Oh yeah, JellyBean.


He better be hitching his wagon to Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis for his retirement plan because from the sound of it he won't be amassing too many royalties from the Vault. He didn't play much on any of the albums, a song or two here and there. I'm not sure how that works. Maybe concert films, there's royalties to gain.

"If you want the wise man to be as angry as the unworthiness of the crimes demands, he must become not angry but insane."
- Seneca, On Anger 2.9.4
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Reply #50 posted 08/20/18 3:40pm

endiadj

Zannaloaf said:



endiadj said:


Whatever. These are grown ass people, supposedly with talent of their own. Use your own name and make your own way. Stop going back to Prince did this or that, Prince worked us too hard, or Prince didn't let me use a name that he gave me nonsense. Grow up and move on.

I like that youare in the position to dismiss the livlihoods of talented people as "whatever".


I'm not dismissing their livleihoods. I'm dismissing some of them holding a grudge, even after death, against Prince for doing things he had a right to do. If it was in Prince's control then he had a right to do it or not do it. End of story.
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Reply #51 posted 08/20/18 8:24pm

funksterr

Put some jelly on it!

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Reply #52 posted 08/21/18 11:26am

minnesoundlvr

He says that Jesse Johnson wanted to be Prince. The more I hear stories from the camp, I think this could be said about a lot of his associates.

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Reply #53 posted 08/21/18 12:41pm

PennyPurple

avatar

minnesoundlvr said:

He says that Jesse Johnson wanted to be Prince. The more I hear stories from the camp, I think this could be said about a lot of his associates.

So does Jellybean. biggrin

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Reply #54 posted 08/21/18 2:52pm

Genesia

avatar

I got famous playing the drums first

falloff

Who is this fool kidding? He ain't famous - except in his own mind.

We don’t mourn artists because we knew them. We mourn them because they helped us know ourselves.
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Reply #55 posted 08/21/18 3:04pm

PennyPurple

avatar

Genesia said:

I got famous playing the drums first

falloff

Who is this fool kidding? He ain't famous - except in his own mind.

Just another idiot that Paisley Park supports.

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Reply #56 posted 08/22/18 5:05am

Graycap23

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PennyPurple said:

minnesoundlvr said:

He says that Jesse Johnson wanted to be Prince. The more I hear stories from the camp, I think this could be said about a lot of his associates.

So does Jellybean. biggrin

What musician doesn't?

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Forums > Associated artists & people > Outstanding JellyBean Interview - Pulls No Punches!