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Reply #30 posted 10/08/18 4:32pm

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Lee Atwater, top Republican Strategist, said this in an 1981 interview:

"You start out in 1954 by saying, “Nigger, nigger, nigger.” By 1968 you can’t say “nigger”—that hurts you, backfires. So you say stuff like, uh, forced busing, states’ rights, and all that stuff, and you’re getting so abstract. Now, you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is, blacks get hurt worse than whites.… “We want to cut this,” is much more abstract than even the busing thing, uh, and a hell of a lot more abstract than “Nigger, nigger.”"

When someone on the right says tax cut he is actually saying N word. Regulations, n word, Immigration, n word. Glad to see how honest Atwater was.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #31 posted 10/08/18 4:44pm

Camileyun

DiminutiveRocker said:



Camileyun said:


DiminutiveRocker said:



you'll get a text or a tweet if that happens mobile



Oh yeah...like the SNL skit this weekend...pretty funny.


No...not like SNL skits ... no no no!

I meant, you will get a text from the president in case of national disaster or alerts. Do you not have a cell phone?


I got what you meant. Thanks wink But, to answer your question, no I don't.
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Reply #32 posted 10/08/18 5:33pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

2freaky4church1 said:

Lee Atwater, top Republican Strategist, said this in an 1981 interview:

"You start out in 1954 by saying, “Nigger, nigger, nigger.” By 1968 you can’t say “nigger”—that hurts you, backfires. So you say stuff like, uh, forced busing, states’ rights, and all that stuff, and you’re getting so abstract. Now, you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is, blacks get hurt worse than whites.… “We want to cut this,” is much more abstract than even the busing thing, uh, and a hell of a lot more abstract than “Nigger, nigger.”"

When someone on the right says tax cut he is actually saying N word. Regulations, n word, Immigration, n word. Glad to see how honest Atwater was.

Remember, when he was dying, Atwater wanted forgiveness for the policies that he pushed that deliberately punished Black people.

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Reply #33 posted 10/09/18 10:26am

herb4

avatar

Camileyun said:

As to Herb4's question, I believe having a GDP over 4% and an unemployment rate at 3.7% is good for us all. I also believe that eliminating some of the regulations that had a chokehold on business and lowering the corporate rates to encourage repatriation was a good move (though, at some point, it may cause hyperinflation, which is not good). We shall see. [Edited 10/8/18 13:20pm]

Which regulations?

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Reply #34 posted 10/09/18 10:37am

RodeoSchro

avatar

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
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Reply #35 posted 10/09/18 11:52am

herb4

avatar

Camileyun said:

As to Herb4's question, I believe having a GDP over 4% and an unemployment rate at 3.7% is good for us all. I also believe that eliminating some of the regulations that had a chokehold on business and lowering the corporate rates to encourage repatriation was a good move (though, at some point, it may cause hyperinflation, which is not good). We shall see. [Edited 10/8/18 13:20pm]

thanks for at least responsing in good faith. I'll try to keep my comments to a minimum in this thread but:

A low unemployment rate and a high GDP aren't policies, they're goals, and in this case very likely the continuation of trends from the last 6-8 years if you look at it.

Lowering the corporate tax rate (that's a policy) might not be a bad idea, provided they actually PAY it, so no strong arguments there.

"Lowering regulations" is a policy but one that doesn't exist in a vacuum so, specifically, which ones? This description is too nebulous.

thanks

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Reply #36 posted 10/10/18 8:22pm

YESWECAN

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

I consider myself a fiscal conservative and I don't trust any of them. I believe they use the divisive language to divide us and make money.

Just watch how freaked out they are about Trump. TDS is real.

Socially, I don't care what anyone does if I'm not paying or it's effecting my space.

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Reply #37 posted 10/11/18 7:39am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

We need far more regulations.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #38 posted 10/12/18 10:36pm

LadyLayla

avatar

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

No one wants to raise taxes--that is a sticking point! I'll pay my fair share but the top 1% of the econ imically elite should pay their fair share too. Don't pay a CPA to do an end run around a freaking tax loophope. Don't do what the Trumps did. Fred Trump beat the IRS out of half a billion $$$. Now I'm sure Joe Kennedy and Bush I did the same sorts of things. I thought the IRS was supposed to be more powerful that the Almighty

Do like FDR and Public Works Authority. Let's get our workers out the fixes our way overdue infrastructure and cut those mafia fingers off when they try to get their piece of the pie. We are well into the 21st century and our airports and train stations look like they belong to 3rd world countries

twocents

Style is the second cousin to class
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Reply #39 posted 10/12/18 11:35pm

YESWECAN

2freaky4church1 said:

Lee Atwater, top Republican Strategist, said this in an 1981 interview:

"You start out in 1954 by saying, “Nigger, nigger, nigger.” By 1968 you can’t say “nigger”—that hurts you, backfires. So you say stuff like, uh, forced busing, states’ rights, and all that stuff, and you’re getting so abstract. Now, you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is, blacks get hurt worse than whites.… “We want to cut this,” is much more abstract than even the busing thing, uh, and a hell of a lot more abstract than “Nigger, nigger.”"

When someone on the right says tax cut he is actually saying N word. Regulations, n word, Immigration, n word. Glad to see how honest Atwater was.

I pop after DNA and you have is qoute's and remarks?

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Reply #40 posted 10/12/18 11:41pm

YESWECAN

LadyLayla said:

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

No one wants to raise taxes--that is a sticking point! I'll pay my fair share but the top 1% of the econ imically elite should pay their fair share too. Don't pay a CPA to do an end run around a freaking tax loophope. Don't do what the Trumps did. Fred Trump beat the IRS out of half a billion $$$. Now I'm sure Joe Kennedy and Bush I did the same sorts of things. I thought the IRS was supposed to be more powerful that the Almighty

Do like FDR and Public Works Authority. Let's get our workers out the fixes our way overdue infrastructure and cut those mafia fingers off when they try to get their piece of the pie. We are well into the 21st century and our airports and train stations look like they belong to 3rd world countries

twocents

I agree with everyone paying. Tax code is crazy on purpose, built buy lawyers who write the laws.

Joe Kennedy bootlegged his son into the Presidency.

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Reply #41 posted 10/13/18 6:26am

13cjk13

YESWECAN said:

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

I consider myself a fiscal conservative and I don't trust any of them. I believe they use the divisive language to divide us and make money.

Just watch how freaked out they are about Trump. TDS is real.

Socially, I don't care what anyone does if I'm not paying or it's effecting my space.

me. me. me. cool.

"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost".
-Thomas Jefferson
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Reply #42 posted 10/16/18 7:14am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

LadyLayla said:

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

No one wants to raise taxes--that is a sticking point! I'll pay my fair share but the top 1% of the econ imically elite should pay their fair share too. Don't pay a CPA to do an end run around a freaking tax loophope. Don't do what the Trumps did. Fred Trump beat the IRS out of half a billion $$$. Now I'm sure Joe Kennedy and Bush I did the same sorts of things. I thought the IRS was supposed to be more powerful that the Almighty

Do like FDR and Public Works Authority. Let's get our workers out the fixes our way overdue infrastructure and cut those mafia fingers off when they try to get their piece of the pie. We are well into the 21st century and our airports and train stations look like they belong to 3rd world countries

twocents


yeahthat nod

"'Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.'' - Thomas Jefferson
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Reply #43 posted 10/16/18 7:58am

seekingtruth

I'm a conservative, but no necessarily a Trump or Republican fan. I think the republicans are just as diluted and corrupt as the democrats are. The fact that people put so much trust in either of the parties is rather laughable or sad (depending on how you want to look at it.)

  • - I appreciate some of the deregulation that has occured. There have been billions of dollars pumped back into corporations with reduced compliance and that has led to mass job creation.
  • I wish they would have been more effective at handling the travesty of Obamacare. At least they tried.
  • Although the new tax policy did not help me at all, it did help many of my friends/family who are lower income households. It also, again, generated corporate revenues that in turn opened jobs. There are currently a little over 7 million job openings in this country. If you are not working, it's because you don't want to.
  • I think the jury is out on the overall trade policy, but it at this point, it at least appears some of the tariff talks were bluffs that are paying out. If, in the wake of the overall negotiations, China responds positively, it will be safe to say Trump knew more about what he was doing than any of us (myself included) were willing to believe.
  • He has selected terrific, originalist judges. The Kavanaugh debate was a silly ploy that has been silently shelved now that the confirmation is over and the accusers were found to be either full of it, or lacking evidence. To believe that a man should have been judged per some very suspect, unsupported accusations is a sad day in this country.
  • The silence we are getting from the saber-rattlers in the middle east is due in large part by a foreign policy that shut them up.
  • NATO is the most corrupt organization in the world. I believe that the administrations management of that relationship has been great.

Those are a few. I am happy to have conversation on specific points in regards to the individual policies, but will ignore you if you come back with the same presumed judgements on motive and intent.

[Edited 10/16/18 8:01am]

True genius is knowing how little
you really know.
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Reply #44 posted 10/16/18 8:00am

seekingtruth

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

Agree 1000%. I am concerned that the system as it currently exists will never address the actual problem.

You cannot spend more than you earn and think that it is sustainable.

True genius is knowing how little
you really know.
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Reply #45 posted 10/16/18 8:04am

seekingtruth

LadyLayla said:

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

No one wants to raise taxes--that is a sticking point! I'll pay my fair share but the top 1% of the econ imically elite should pay their fair share too. Don't pay a CPA to do an end run around a freaking tax loophope. Don't do what the Trumps did. Fred Trump beat the IRS out of half a billion $$$. Now I'm sure Joe Kennedy and Bush I did the same sorts of things. I thought the IRS was supposed to be more powerful that the Almighty

Do like FDR and Public Works Authority. Let's get our workers out the fixes our way overdue infrastructure and cut those mafia fingers off when they try to get their piece of the pie. We are well into the 21st century and our airports and train stations look like they belong to 3rd world countries

twocents

If you don't like the tax code, your only option is to elect people who are serious about tax reform. The loopholes are lawful for the most part and are there, so ALL parties (republican and democrats) can hide behind rhetoric while still supporting those who can have the legal team to play the game.

To be clear: BOTH PARTIES DO THIS

This myth that the republicans are more for the rich than the democrats is silly, and those who believe are just naive enough to believe what the democrats are saying.

True genius is knowing how little
you really know.
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Reply #46 posted 10/16/18 8:12am

RodeoSchro

avatar

seekingtruth said:

I'm a conservative, but no necessarily a Trump or Republican fan. I think the republicans are just as diluted and corrupt as the democrats are. The fact that people put so much trust in either of the parties is rather laughable or sad (depending on how you want to look at it.)

  • - I appreciate some of the deregulation that has occured. There have been billions of dollars pumped back into corporations with reduced compliance and that has led to mass job creation.
  • I wish they would have been more effective at handling the travesty of Obamacare. At least they tried.
  • Although the new tax policy did not help me at all, it did help many of my friends/family who are lower income households. It also, again, generated corporate revenues that in turn opened jobs. There are currently a little over 7 million job openings in this country. If you are not working, it's because you don't want to.
  • I think the jury is out on the overall trade policy, but it at this point, it at least appears some of the tariff talks were bluffs that are paying out. If, in the wake of the overall negotiations, China responds positively, it will be safe to say Trump knew more about what he was doing than any of us (myself included) were willing to believe.
  • He has selected terrific, originalist judges. The Kavanaugh debate was a silly ploy that has been silently shelved now that the confirmation is over and the accusers were found to be either full of it, or lacking evidence. To believe that a man should have been judged per some very suspect, unsupported accusations is a sad day in this country.
  • The silence we are getting from the saber-rattlers in the middle east is due in large part by a foreign policy that shut them up.
  • NATO is the most corrupt organization in the world. I believe that the administrations management of that relationship has been great.

Those are a few. I am happy to have conversation on specific points in regards to the individual policies, but will ignore you if you come back with the same presumed judgements on motive and intent.

[Edited 10/16/18 8:01am]




I don't think the tax plan did anything to create jobs. It's been pretty well documented that the majority of corporate largess received from the tax cuts was used to buy back shares, which has inflated the stock market. That's great if you owned stock, but I don't see how it led to any job creation.

President Trump's job numbers aren't any better than President Obama's. One could argue that Trump inherited a good economy, while Obama inherited a disaster. But this isn't a knock on Trump per se; if one inherits an economy that was already almost at full employment, it's impossible to dramatically improve on that.

I heard today that Obamacare currently has a 61% approval rating among voters (per an internal GOP poll, no less) while the tax cut has only a 30% approval among voters. That's why you see so many Republicans trying to run on keeping coverage for pre-existing conditions - a staple of Obamacare. That's a real head-scratcher, as pretty much every Republican state attorney general has sued to overturn that portion of the ACA which guarantees coverage of pre-existing conditions.

On a personal note, I am in the process of patenting a particular device in the musical accessories segment. The current manufacture of the thing I am working on is 100% in China. Presently there is a 10% tariff on musical accessories manufactured in China, but it's going up to a 25% tariff soon. So, none of the companies want to have these things manufactured in China any longer.

Guess where those manufacturing jobs are going to? America, right?

Nope.

Vietnam. Not to America.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
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Reply #47 posted 10/16/18 8:15am

RodeoSchro

avatar

seekingtruth said:

RodeoSchro said:

I am a conservative and have voted for more Republicans than Democrats over the course of my life, so can I take a shot at this?

My main concern is fiscal conservatism. My core belief is that "debt" is a four-letter word. My number one worry is that interest rates will rise to the point that we cannot make our interest payments without creating runaway inflation. That, of course, will make issuing new debt to cover payments on the old debt pretty much impossible.

There are no Republicans who address this issue in the proper way. None. And sad to say, I don't see any Democrats addressing it properly, either.

Agree 1000%. I am concerned that the system as it currently exists will never address the actual problem.

You cannot spend more than you earn and think that it is sustainable.



You are 1,000% right.

It's so dang frustrating knowing that had we kept on the course we were on in 2000, with the existing tax code of 2000, we could have been debt-free today. Debt free! Even throwing in the cost of invading the wrong country, and we probably still wouldn't have a nationaal debt of more than $4 trillion or so.

But the way I see it is, if we did it once then we can do it again. But it's got to be by raising the top tax rate. That's what got us in good shpe 20 years ago, and we have to do it again.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
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Reply #48 posted 10/16/18 8:30am

seekingtruth

RodeoSchro said:

seekingtruth said:

I'm a conservative, but no necessarily a Trump or Republican fan. I think the republicans are just as diluted and corrupt as the democrats are. The fact that people put so much trust in either of the parties is rather laughable or sad (depending on how you want to look at it.)

  • - I appreciate some of the deregulation that has occured. There have been billions of dollars pumped back into corporations with reduced compliance and that has led to mass job creation.
  • I wish they would have been more effective at handling the travesty of Obamacare. At least they tried.
  • Although the new tax policy did not help me at all, it did help many of my friends/family who are lower income households. It also, again, generated corporate revenues that in turn opened jobs. There are currently a little over 7 million job openings in this country. If you are not working, it's because you don't want to.
  • I think the jury is out on the overall trade policy, but it at this point, it at least appears some of the tariff talks were bluffs that are paying out. If, in the wake of the overall negotiations, China responds positively, it will be safe to say Trump knew more about what he was doing than any of us (myself included) were willing to believe.
  • He has selected terrific, originalist judges. The Kavanaugh debate was a silly ploy that has been silently shelved now that the confirmation is over and the accusers were found to be either full of it, or lacking evidence. To believe that a man should have been judged per some very suspect, unsupported accusations is a sad day in this country.
  • The silence we are getting from the saber-rattlers in the middle east is due in large part by a foreign policy that shut them up.
  • NATO is the most corrupt organization in the world. I believe that the administrations management of that relationship has been great.

Those are a few. I am happy to have conversation on specific points in regards to the individual policies, but will ignore you if you come back with the same presumed judgements on motive and intent.

[Edited 10/16/18 8:01am]




I don't think the tax plan did anything to create jobs. It's been pretty well documented that the majority of corporate largess received from the tax cuts was used to buy back shares, which has inflated the stock market. That's great if you owned stock, but I don't see how it led to any job creation.

President Trump's job numbers aren't any better than President Obama's. One could argue that Trump inherited a good economy, while Obama inherited a disaster. But this isn't a knock on Trump per se; if one inherits an economy that was already almost at full employment, it's impossible to dramatically improve on that.

I heard today that Obamacare currently has a 61% approval rating among voters (per an internal GOP poll, no less) while the tax cut has only a 30% approval among voters. That's why you see so many Republicans trying to run on keeping coverage for pre-existing conditions - a staple of Obamacare. That's a real head-scratcher, as pretty much every Republican state attorney general has sued to overturn that portion of the ACA which guarantees coverage of pre-existing conditions.

On a personal note, I am in the process of patenting a particular device in the musical accessories segment. The current manufacture of the thing I am working on is 100% in China. Presently there is a 10% tariff on musical accessories manufactured in China, but it's going up to a 25% tariff soon. So, none of the companies want to have these things manufactured in China any longer.

Guess where those manufacturing jobs are going to? America, right?

Nope.

Vietnam. Not to America.

I misstated the job creation through deregulation point. I was thinking about multiple points at once.

Deregulation did, however promote a stimulation for corporations that ended up having real-world incentives for employees. It was not a minor effect.

I don't think we can really compare Trump's economy to Obama's yet. I am not as sold that Obama's policies would have had a positive long term effect. the issue here is that debts are continuing to climb and the accumulation of Trump policies and Obama policies are going to be null if that does not get fixed.

The popularity of a policy does not necessary indicate it's effectiveness. Public perception is guided as much by PR as it is personal experience. I too many people who have been negatively effected (myself included) by Obamacare. I don't see it as being sustainable long term as has already been seen. The pre-existing conditions part of it will be the ultimate collapse of the system although that is a longterm effect. At this point, it is just another unsustainable entitlement that will lead us to a financial collapse at some point down the road if not corrected.

As a professional musician, I'm always excited about the mention of musical accessories. I don't know that the tariff's will actually have long term teeth. It is possible, albeit not certain, that these tariff's are bluffs. We will see.

True genius is knowing how little
you really know.
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Reply #49 posted 10/16/18 8:47am

RodeoSchro

avatar

seekingtruth said:

RodeoSchro said:




I don't think the tax plan did anything to create jobs. It's been pretty well documented that the majority of corporate largess received from the tax cuts was used to buy back shares, which has inflated the stock market. That's great if you owned stock, but I don't see how it led to any job creation.

President Trump's job numbers aren't any better than President Obama's. One could argue that Trump inherited a good economy, while Obama inherited a disaster. But this isn't a knock on Trump per se; if one inherits an economy that was already almost at full employment, it's impossible to dramatically improve on that.

I heard today that Obamacare currently has a 61% approval rating among voters (per an internal GOP poll, no less) while the tax cut has only a 30% approval among voters. That's why you see so many Republicans trying to run on keeping coverage for pre-existing conditions - a staple of Obamacare. That's a real head-scratcher, as pretty much every Republican state attorney general has sued to overturn that portion of the ACA which guarantees coverage of pre-existing conditions.

On a personal note, I am in the process of patenting a particular device in the musical accessories segment. The current manufacture of the thing I am working on is 100% in China. Presently there is a 10% tariff on musical accessories manufactured in China, but it's going up to a 25% tariff soon. So, none of the companies want to have these things manufactured in China any longer.

Guess where those manufacturing jobs are going to? America, right?

Nope.

Vietnam. Not to America.

I misstated the job creation through deregulation point. I was thinking about multiple points at once.

Deregulation did, however promote a stimulation for corporations that ended up having real-world incentives for employees. It was not a minor effect.

I don't think we can really compare Trump's economy to Obama's yet. I am not as sold that Obama's policies would have had a positive long term effect. the issue here is that debts are continuing to climb and the accumulation of Trump policies and Obama policies are going to be null if that does not get fixed.

The popularity of a policy does not necessary indicate it's effectiveness. Public perception is guided as much by PR as it is personal experience. I too many people who have been negatively effected (myself included) by Obamacare. I don't see it as being sustainable long term as has already been seen. The pre-existing conditions part of it will be the ultimate collapse of the system although that is a longterm effect. At this point, it is just another unsustainable entitlement that will lead us to a financial collapse at some point down the road if not corrected.

As a professional musician, I'm always excited about the mention of musical accessories. I don't know that the tariff's will actually have long term teeth. It is possible, albeit not certain, that these tariff's are bluffs. We will see.



After I get this deal patented, and if I'm able to do something good with it, I'll let you know. I'm a musican too, although certainly not a professional. But all the pros I know really like this gizmo, so hopefully I can generate some taxed-at-21% income!

However, on the tariffs: The person I spoke with about manufacturing and selling this is the guy that publishes all the sales figures for musical instruments and accessories, etc. He knows the entire industry and told me that the three main manufacturers of my segment all produce 100% of their stuff in China. They aren't going to wait around and see if the tariffs are going to last, or not.

Rather than absorb a 25% increase in cost, and/or increase the wholesale and retail prices of their products, they're just going to move their manufacturing to a non-tariffed country. But that country still won't be the USA. I don't know enough about manufacturing to tell you why it's cheaper to make these gizmos in the Far East, but apparently it is.

So in this particular case, the USA won't benefit from any new jobs. China will be punished, and Vietnam or maybe another Far Eastern country will benefit.

I don't know what the USA gets other than a pissed-off China.

.

[Edited 10/16/18 8:53am]

Second Funkiest White Man in America

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Reply #50 posted 10/18/18 3:17pm

djThunderfunk

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RodeoSchro said:

I don't know enough about manufacturing to tell you why it's cheaper to make these gizmos in the Far East, but apparently it is.


It's not a mystery.

https://www.ilo.org/asia/.../index.htm



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Reply #51 posted 10/19/18 10:17am

2freaky4church
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Rodeo, wtf. Ah, cheaper labor maybe. They actually send the parts to china, Chinese slaves put the parts together, then the gizmos come to us. Like how we send parts to Monterray Mexico where they build cars and the cars come to us. Corporate pigs look for value for them not for us.

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Reply #52 posted 10/19/18 1:00pm

RodeoSchro

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2freaky4church1 said:

Rodeo, wtf. Ah, cheaper labor maybe. They actually send the parts to china, Chinese slaves put the parts together, then the gizmos come to us. Like how we send parts to Monterray Mexico where they build cars and the cars come to us. Corporate pigs look for value for them not for us.




Remember - it's cheaper to put these gizmos together in Vietnam, and presumably other Far Eastern countries, than it is in the USA. That includes the price of shipping to get my gizmos here.

I have no idea if EVERY country in the Far East employs slave labor. Maybe they do. I'm still learning about this and it's real-world earning - not Google learning.

But the point is that the tariffs from our genius president aren't going to bring manufacturing jobs back to the USA. They're just going to drive them to non-tariffed countries that can produce gizmos cheaper than we can.

There is no benefit to the USA unless, I guess, our genius president institutes tariffs on every country in the world that makes gizmos.

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