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Thread started 02/22/18 9:46pm

hausofmoi7

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The Other NRA.

There is one gun for every 12th person on the planet.
The "third world" and "developing nations" are being flooded with weapons, with the military industrial complex in America being the largest seller and provider of these weapons around the world.
There are also countries in Europe which have strict domestic gun laws that are also helping to pump weapons into other nations.

Here is an article discussing the global impact of weapon manufacturers



https://www.counterpunch....other-nra/


Children are dying.

They are caught in the crossfire between profits and an unassailable national identity, and their numbers only seem to increase with each passing news cycle.

This carnage continues because a well-entrenched interest group refuses to relent, forever unwilling to cede their ideology or their profits. And the perpetual machinery of their power thrives on the artful conflation of one with the other.

But this is not the NRA.

The most powerful “gun lobby” in America is the MIC—the Military-Industrial Complex.

This is not some faceless, shadowy cadre of conspirators. No, those who charge “conspiracy theory” only show their ignorance. In fact, just like the NRA, the MIC is publicly disclosed and highly visible. In touting the accomplishments of the “Top 100” members of the MIC, Defense News wrote:

“The U. S. defense community encompasses the best America has to offer: leadership, innovation, technology and vision. It’s a combination that has helped ensure the U.S. has fielded the best-trained, best-equipped military force in the world for nearly a century.”

There is your leading gun lobby, America.

Note the “best equipped” part of that “journalistic” paean. This translates into trillions upon trillions of dollars spent on guns and weapons and bombs and bullets since the end of World War II.

Meanwhile, little-known massacres pile up overseas, even as they shock and awe us here at home. And while the Bushmaster is debated, the drone and the cluster-bomb and missile fly under the radar and through the budgetary process.

But the fix is in, anyway.

Unlike the NRA, the MIC isn’t limited to just spending money on lobbyists and advertisements and voting guides. Their influence peddlers pass unabated through the ever-revolving door between government and industry. They actually place their people in positions of power and then, in turn, they employ those Congressional aides, policymakers and former generals when they leave “public service” to cash in on their insider status.

The people who plot and plan and execute the wars can easily become the lobbyists who sell weapons of war to their friends and colleagues in Congress, the Pentagon and to regimes around the world. It is a perfectly closed system.

Even the all-powerful NRA cannot boast of such a “total influence,” one that is economic, political and, yes, even spiritual. Nor can it mount the sort of defense that the defense industry can, will and has whenever the idea of cutting the MIC’s budget is simply broached.

While the NRA clings to the 2ND Amendment in the face of one senseless massacre after another, the MIC churns on forcefully and relentlessly despite one senseless war after another.

Big money on Vietnam. On Iraq. And on and on in Afghanistan, despite Osama bin Laden’s death.

The Cold War was the gift that kept on giving, but the Soviets simply couldn’t match America’s appetite for destruction. Enemies like that are hard to come by. Luckily for the MIC, an amorphous and ill-defined specter of terrorism stemmed the budgetary bleeding of that all-to-fleeting moment we called “the peace dividend.”

Finally, there were, and still are, dozens of “shadow wars” around the world, with the MIC funding and arming a motley crew of proxies and dictators and “freedom fighters.”

The world is awash in American arms and ordinance. Sometimes they end up in the hands of both friends and foes. Sometimes they end up in the hands of both sides of the same battle. They can be used to crack down. Or by death squads. And the use of children to fight doesn’t seem to be a problem.

And neither does killing them.

So, as we glare sharply at the NRA and question the availability of guns here at home, perhaps it is time we finally address the fundamental hypocrisy at the heart of it all. This nation has been run by a much more powerful gun lobby for the last sixty years, and many have paid the price for a culture of violence spread the world over by the Military-Industrial Complex.

JP Sottile is a freelance journalist, published historian, radio co-host and documentary filmmaker (The Warning, 2008). His credits include a stint on the Newshour news desk, C-SPAN, newsmagazine producer for ABC affiliate WJLA in Washington, and a two-time Washington Regional Emmy Award Winner. His weekly show, Inside the Headlines w/ The Newsvandal, co-hosted by James Moore, airs every Friday on KRUU-FM in Fairfield, Iowa. He blogs under the pseudonym “the Newsvandal.”


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[Edited 2/23/18 6:40am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #1 posted 02/22/18 10:37pm

hausofmoi7

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Inside the U.S. Military Recruitment Program That Trained Nikolas Cruz to be “A Very Good Shot”

[b]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #2 posted 02/23/18 6:39am

hausofmoi7

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d/p
[Edited 2/23/18 6:44am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #3 posted 02/27/18 7:00pm

hausofmoi7

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According to Google; The Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps is a federal program sponsored by the United States Armed Forces in high schools and also in some middle schools across the United States and United States military bases across the world.


https://www.democracynow....z_knew_how

Extended web-only discussion with Pat Elder, the director of the National Coalition to Protect Student Privacy, a group that confronts militarism in the schools. He is the author of “Military Recruiting in the United States.” The gunman who fired on students and teachers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, a 19-year-old white former student named Nikolas Cruz, was a member of the Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program, known as JROTC. Cruz also took part in a four-person JROTC marksmanship team at the school which had received $10,000 in funding from the NRA. “[The NRA] realize that if they can start linking the children with the guns at age 13 in the high schools, it’s a win-win proposition for them and for the sellers of weaponry,” says Elder.
[Edited 2/27/18 19:13pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #4 posted 03/05/18 4:21am

hausofmoi7

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If only the lost lives in places like Yemen could garner the same empathy as the lives lost in the west.
we are all fighting the exact same weapons manufacturers, this should be a natural alliance.

I don't see why this isn't happening.



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[Edited 3/5/18 5:59am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #5 posted 03/05/18 4:33am

hausofmoi7

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People (including democrats) use the argument that "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun, is a good guy with a gun” in defense of the military industrial complex, weapons manufacturers and thier lobbyists selling arms and pumping other countries full of guns and weapons.

If you support domestic gun laws, then you should also support opposing the military industrial complex, as "None of you truly believes until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.



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[Edited 3/5/18 5:53am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #6 posted 03/05/18 10:07pm

hausofmoi7

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The Cover-Up Of Australian Arms Sales To Saudi Arabia
https://newmatilda.com/20...di-arabia/


"it looks like the Apocalypse", UN's humanitarian chief has said on the destruction in Yemen


Michael Brull explores our nation’s weak pretext for not disclosing our exports to Saudi Arabia.

As the humanitarian catastrophe in Yemen spirals out of control – in part a consequence of Australia’s support for a Saudi-led siege on the country – it is worth cataloguing the government’s lies about why it won’t disclose military exports to Saudi Arabia.

The government approved four military exports to Saudi Arabia last year, and five more permits were approved since June this year. In response to public questioning, it has refused to disclose anything about those exports.

In Senate Estimates, Former Greens Senator Scott Ludlam asked the Minister for Defence, Marise Payne to tell us about our military exports to Saudi Arabia. Payne refused.

“Releasing that information would breach that confidence and undermine any trust in our ability to protect applicants’ professional and commercial information, which would, in fact, also be detrimental to our ability to effectively regulate the export of military goods and technology,” Payne explained.

Other officials similarly stonewalled.

By some miracle, in March this year, Senator Ludlam was able to sufficiently water down a motion on disclosing our military exports to Saudi Arabia, to the point that even the Australian Labor Party Senators voted for it. The motion urged the government to disclose documents relating to our military exports, and for Christopher Pyne, the Minister for Defence Industry, to disclose his itinerary on his previous trip to Saudi Arabia.

The government ignored the motion. Senator Ludlam proposed a motion noting this failure, and ordering that those documents be tabled, and required an explanation for any failure if the documents weren’t tabled. Senator Nick Xenophon and his colleagues backed the Greens. The rest of the Coalition and other Senators voted against Ludlam’s motion, including the ‘battler’ Jacqui Lambie, the ‘libertarian’ David Leyonhjelm, Derryn Hinch, and One Nation’s Senators.

The government claimed “public interest immunity” from this motion. This is “on the basis of commercial confidentiality, Australia’s relations with foreign governments and national security”.

Senator Payne set out the three rationales in a letter to the Senate. In terms of “commercial confidentiality”, she explained that this could have a “detrimental effect”, by letting competitors know of a market opportunity (to sell such defence materiel to Saudi Arabia), and could “reduce buyers’ confidence in doing business with Australian companies”.
[Edited 3/5/18 22:19pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #7 posted 03/05/18 10:41pm

hausofmoi7

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Senator Payne set out the three rationales in a letter to the Senate. In terms of “commercial confidentiality”, she explained that this could have a “detrimental effect”, by letting competitors know of a market opportunity (to sell such defence materiel to Saudi Arabia), and could “reduce buyers’ confidence in doing business with Australian companies”



Australia refusing to disclose details of its arms sales to Saudi Arabia because it fears someone else will steal thier business

Wow.

Genocide is now a business opportunity and market.






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[Edited 3/6/18 0:20am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #8 posted 03/06/18 12:25am

hausofmoi7

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Wolf Blitzer is worried defense contractors will loose jobs if U.S stops arming Saudi Arabia
https://theintercept.com/...di-arabia/


SEN. RAND PAUL’S expression of opposition to a $1.1 billion U.S. arms sale to Saudi Arabia — which has been brutally bombing civilian targets in Yemen using U.S.-made weapons for more than a year now — alarmed CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Thursday afternoon.

Blitzer’s concern: That stopping the sale could result in fewer jobs for arms manufacturers.

“So for you this is a moral issue,” he told Paul during the Kentucky Republican’s appearance on CNN. “Because you know, there’s a lot of jobs at stake. Certainly if a lot of these defense contractors stop selling war planes, other sophisticated equipment to Saudi Arabia, there’s going to be a significant loss of jobs, of revenue here in the United States. That’s secondary from your standpoint?”

Paul stayed on message. “Well not only is it a moral question, its a constitutional question,” Paul said. “Our founding fathers very directly and specifically did not give the president the power to go to war. They gave it to Congress. So Congress needs to step up and this is what I’m doing.”

Saudi Arabia began bombing Yemen in March 2015, and has since been responsible for the majority of the 10,000 deaths in the war so far. The U.S.-backed bombing coalition has been accused of intentionally targeting civilians, hospitals, factories, markets, schools, and homes. The situation is so bad that the Red Cross has started donating morgue units to Yemeni hospitals.

The war’s incredible humanitarian toll has generated an increasing outcry in the United States. Earlier this month, more than 60 members of Congress signed a letter asking the administration to delay the most recent arms shipment. Ordinarily, under the Arms Export Control Act, Congress has 30 days to block arms sales proposed by the administration — but by announcing the arms sale in August, most of those 30 days fell during Congress’s August recess. That 30-day window expired Thursday night and the White House has not granted the request for extra time.

The Obama administration has sold more weapons to the Saudis than any other administration, pledging more than $115 billion worth of small arms, tanks, helicopters, missiles, and aircraft.

So yes, it’s a legitimate moral issue. What it’s not is a legitimate economic issue.

If you’re worried about jobs, military spending is not where you look. It’s an inefficient way to create jobs, because it has a lower multiplier effect — meaning how much it ripples in the wider economy. One study from 2011 found that $1 billion put into military spending would create approximately 11,200 jobs, but that same amount of money put into education creates 26,700 jobs.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #9 posted 03/06/18 7:26am

2freaky4church
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Crowder thinks Blitzer is a lib..

Blitzer used to write for the Jerusalem Post. He is a huge zionist.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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